Author Topic: Collection of national interest stolen  (Read 3171 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Collection of national interest stolen
« on: July 10, 2007, 01:44:33 AM »
The lesson: if your collection is worth a pretty penny, don't keep everything at home. Rent a bank vault. Your coins are worth much more to you than to the barbarian thieves.

Source: BBC

Rare coins worth ?500,000 stolen
 
Scotland's most important collection of antique coins has been stolen, police have revealed.

The unique collection, which has been valued at more than ?500,000, features pieces dating back to 1136, when the very first Scottish coins were minted.

A total of more than 1,000 coins were stolen from the home of Lord and Lady Stewartby in Broughton, near Peebles.

A "substantial reward" has been offered to anyone who can help recover the collection.

The raid happened more than a month ago, but police have only just released details of the theft for operational reasons.

Coin dealers have also been asked to look out for the stolen collection.

Lord Stewartby has been collecting coins since he was a child, and is recognised as being a leading authority on the subject.

His collection contained a number of irreplaceable pieces, many of which were unique, including one coin that was struck in Aberdeen 700 years ago during the reign of Robert the Bruce.

Most of the coins are thought to have been minted in Scotland between 1136 and the reign of Alexander III in the late 13th Century.

Other specimens were created under David II in the 14th century, and James I and James II in the 1400s.

Lord Stewartby made his collection available for experts in numismatics - the study of coins - to carry out research, and had been working on compiling a full catalogue.

His daughter, Lydia Pretzlik, said the family had been "devastated" by the theft, which happened when the house was lying empty. A quantity of jewellery was also taken.

A reward understood to be a six-figure sum has been offered for the safe return of the coins.

Mrs Pretzlik added: "My father collected the first of those coins when he was a young boy, so in many ways it represents the loss of his life's work.

"He is much more concerned with retaining the integrity of the collection, which is the best collection of Scottish coins in the world, than with any commercial loss."

Mrs Pretzlik said it was impossible to say for sure whether the coins had been specifically targeted by the thieves.

But she added: "The collection is pretty well known and it is an unusual thing to steal unless you know what you are looking for."

Nick Holmes, senior curator in numismatics at the National Museums of Scotland, said the theft had dealt a devastating blow to the study of historic coins in Scotland.

Easily identifiable

He added: "In terms of that period, Lord Stewartby had more coins in his collection than the National Museums of Scotland have.

"He had managed to collect a number of very rare pieces which were previously unknown.

"It wouldn't be putting it mildly to say that this theft has put the study of numismatics back 50 years because if the collection is not recovered all of the work Lord Stewartby has put in over the past half century will be lost."

Mr Holmes said it would be "very difficult" for the thieves to sell the rarest coins in Britain because dealers would realise they were from the stolen collection.

But he added: "The problem comes with the more common pieces which are not as easily identifiable as being from this collection, or if the thieves manage to take it abroad."

A Lothian and Borders Police spokesman added: "This collection is a unique part of Scottish history and its loss cannot be underestimated. We have carried out a significant amount of inquiry so far and are now appealing to the public for help.

"We would appeal to anyone who may have information as to the whereabouts of the collection or anyone who has been offered some rare and unique coins."
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Collection of national interest stolen
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2012, 10:52:04 PM »
Crimewatch finds potential Broughton coin theft leads
27 January 2012

The "unique" collection was taken from the Broughton home of Lord and Lady Stewartby in June 2007.

An appeal for information was screened by the BBC on Thursday night.

About 40 calls have been received and Lothian and Borders Police said they would analyse the information received and follow up any new lines of inquiry.

The collection of early Scottish coins included some dating back nearly 900 years.

A 50,000 reward has been offered for any information leading to their return to their rightful owner.

Det Ch Insp Grant Dougall appealed for any dealers or collectors who might have seen the coins to get in touch.

"We believe it was a targeted raid because the thieves only took the coins and some jewellery stored with them," he said.

"We have conducted extensive inquiries across the country and to-date not a single coin from the collection has surfaced."

Phillip Skingley, of London coin dealers and auctioneers Spink, said the items were of great importance.

"Essentially they are all unique pieces of history in their own right," he said.

"Each one can tell us something about the social and economic history of the period in Scotland.

"This is on a par with the theft of a national treasure."

Source: BBC
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Candy

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Re: Collection of national interest stolen
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2013, 04:17:00 PM »
Has there been any progress made in finding the coins ?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Collection of national interest stolen
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2013, 10:32:12 PM »
None. The coins have not been recovered, in spite of a reward, according to Wikipedia

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Candy

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Re: Collection of national interest stolen
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2013, 10:35:33 PM »
None. The coins have not been recovered, in spite of a reward, according to Wikipedia

Peter

Interesting stuff , it really looks like they are being held held by some evil coin collector   >:D

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Collection of national interest stolen
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2013, 11:41:21 PM »
Unfortunately, such collections are hard to impossible to fence and are often melted for the precious metal.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.