Author Topic: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare counterstamped coins  (Read 190 times)

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Online Alex Island

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Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare counterstamped coins
« on: June 06, 2020, 03:49:53 PM »
Rarely encountered token, Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands.

At the auction, I found an interesting coin. Further research has confirmed island ownership.

Vinalhaven Island counterstamped coin:
« Last Edit: June 07, 2020, 09:54:03 AM by Alex Island »
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Online Alex Island

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare token
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2020, 03:55:54 PM »
I found interesting information about this, and another coin. W.H.Vinal
« Last Edit: June 06, 2020, 04:09:42 PM by Alex Island »
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Online Alex Island

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare token
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2020, 04:07:06 PM »
Later I discovered another interesting, but different coin. It has the same surname but different initials. I have no information about this coin, does it apply to the same islands?

Maybe someone owns this information: E.Vinal
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Offline malj1

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare tokens
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2020, 12:14:43 AM »
As it says "Founded by his great grandfather and grandfather" it could be initials of either of these people, or even his father.
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare tokens
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2020, 09:36:47 AM »
As the US coin is dated later than the Spanish colonial coin, I suspect E is the younger person. The countermarks on both coins seems to have been made in the same fashion (single punch) with the same font - though the font is of a rather common, serifed type, its letter L stands out for its long serif, repeated in the E.

I can't find a use for these counterstamps. Fishing, shipbuilding, logging and shipping were important early businesses on Vinalhaven. It is hard to see their need for silver dollars or why there would be a shortage of them on the island.

Maybe they were lucky coins, found "in the attic" one or two generations later and presumed to be souvenirs of the town's "founding" generation? Wikipedia seems bent on playing down the role of the Vinal family. Maybe the Vinal family considered them proof that their ancestors had been on the island for generations? Whatever the case, these are not tokens but privately counterstamped coins.

Peter
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare counterstamped coins
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2021, 11:50:58 PM »
These are interesting coins that I'll have to look into. BTW, Peter, counterstamped coins are considered tokens by collectors, at least here, so would fit into both catagories. :)

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare counterstamped coins
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2021, 09:33:03 AM »
As a token collector, that bothers me, Bruce. I acknowledge that many collectors use the word token indiscriminately for any numismatic item that isn't a coin, with the exception of decorations and manhole covers, but that makes the word sound like a garbage can. In reality, there is a huge difference between say an expensive art medal or a cheap medallion and a token, while there is little difference between a token and its paper equivalent (think of US tax tokens that may be metallic or paper).

To me. it's all about how it is used. A token is used to replace a coin. If someone uses some punches or a rusty nail to add political propaganda to a coin, the coin can still circulate as a coin, as long as you can find someone who accepts it (banks included, even though they will retire the piece). If another piece of metal is so used, I would not expect anyone to accept it as money.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Vinalhaven Island, Fox Islands rare counterstamped coins
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2021, 11:18:37 AM »
I see your point, Peter, but even most catalogers (Brubk, Rulau, etc.) and collectors consider counterstamped coins tokens. I think the reasoning is that after a stamp or symbol is struck on the coin it becomes an object that advertises, identifies, or points out something to someone and thus a token. It always remains a coin with a stated value but takes on a dual role once stamped.  I don't go out of my way to call them tokens, I just call them what they are...counterstamped coins. My alltime favorite descroption of counterstamped coins is that of the late Greg Brubk "Advertising on the world's smallest billboards."

Bruce
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