Author Topic: Another Buwayhid low-gold dinar  (Read 124 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Another Buwayhid low-gold dinar
« on: October 15, 2020, 02:41:04 PM »
Fascinated by the low-gold dinars I found another Buwayhid that's rather like my friend's one that I showed in August, but even more vague. Is it from worn dies or from dirty ones?

Buwayhids, pale gold dinar. Baha' al-Dawla Abu Nasr Firuz Kharshadh (AH 379-403 / AD 989-1012). 398? = 1007/8 AD. Suq al-Ahwaz. 28 mm, 4.41 gr. Album 1573. It's rather silvery-goldy, not like these, but I think you can see a patch of copper in the centre of the reverse.

-- Paul


Offline aws22

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Re: Another Buwayhid low-gold dinar
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2020, 04:29:15 PM »
Dear Paul, yes it is similar to you coin posted on August 10, 2020, with the same mint and date 395 AH.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Another Buwayhid low-gold dinar
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2020, 07:20:28 PM »
Thanks, Maythem! So it is 395 again, not 398? Here are two pictures with different light and a bit larger, does that help?
-- Paul

Offline aws22

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Re: Another Buwayhid low-gold dinar
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2020, 08:24:29 PM »
Thank you Paul, this is a better photo showing the date, it is definitely 39x, the first word looks like " خمسه Khamsa 5 ", but I need someone to confirm that.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Another Buwayhid low-gold dinar
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2020, 10:46:56 PM »
The loss of detail is indeed unusual.

Speculation: I wonder if the minters were perhaps making dies with dies, i.e. using a master die to make working dies. As tempering hadn't been invented yet, the number of working dies that could be made from a single master would have been very limited, but it would have been faster and cheaper than cutting each die by hand.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.