Author Topic: Beads and dentillations on coins  (Read 1476 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2020, 04:14:26 PM »


New Guinea, 1 penny, 1936.  Obverse.





New Guinea, 1 penny, 1936.  Reverse.



My next exhibit is from the Territory of New Guinea. It was administered by Australia at the time.

The dentillations, if they can be called that, are a combination of semi-spheres and the most disgustingly, disgracefully sharp and spiky dentillations in the whole history of numismatics. It makes me wonder what artist George Kruger-Gray's mental state was when he thought of using such shapes.

 
« Last Edit: June 12, 2020, 04:27:11 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2020, 04:17:29 PM »


New Guinea, 3 pence, 1935.  Obverse.





New Guinea, 3 pence, 1935.  Reverse.



The New Guinea three pence coin was similar, as was the sixpence (not shown).


See: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea.
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Online quaziright

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2020, 04:37:06 PM »
could it be the upper part of tribal Spears and shields?

Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #33 on: June 13, 2020, 11:45:16 AM »
could it be the upper part of tribal Spears and shields?

That's an intriguing idea. I have never read the files in the National Archives (London) relating to New Guinea, so I cannot say. However, given the highly unusual nature of these semi-beads and denticles, there might indeed have been an unusual reason for them, so who knows?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #34 on: July 11, 2020, 10:26:42 PM »
Egypt, 1 pound, 1974.  First anniversary of the October War.

An unusually shaped set of denticles.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #35 on: July 21, 2020, 02:18:41 AM »
Seychelles, 25 cents, 2007.  Long denticles.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2020, 03:22:17 PM »
Uruguay, 10 pesos, 2000.

Here the dentillations do not reach the rim. Are they marking time, as on a clock?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #37 on: July 27, 2020, 04:31:01 PM »
There are exactly 60 marks on the ring...

Peter
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #38 on: July 27, 2020, 04:42:31 PM »
Oh, thank you, Herr Asperger! You counted them all.  :-\
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2020, 12:46:00 AM »
Mali - coins of 1975 to 1977.

Here you have four triangular shapes around the denomination. They appear to point to the similarly triangular shapes around the rim.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #40 on: July 31, 2020, 02:14:49 AM »
Barbados, 1 dollar - circulation coin.

This heptagonal coin has a bead circle on both sides. Admittedly, all the other coins in the series also do, but they are all round.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #41 on: July 31, 2020, 12:06:05 PM »
Mali - coins of 1975 to 1977.

Here you have four triangular shapes around the denomination. They appear to point to the similarly triangular shapes around the rim.

Two, rather than four is the magic number. The four inside triangles are sometimes solid, like those on the rim, sometimes divided in three plus the outline is four triangles and there are four of each. However, there are 32 triangles on the rim of each coin (I counted them just so you could call me an asparagus) and 32 is a power of 2, but not a power of four.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #42 on: July 31, 2020, 04:07:35 PM »
Two, rather than four is the magic number. The four inside triangles are sometimes solid, like those on the rim, sometimes divided in three plus the outline is four triangles and there are four of each. However, there are 32 triangles on the rim of each coin (I counted them just so you could call me an asparagus) and 32 is a power of 2, but not a power of four.

I would never call you an asparagus - you could get eaten alive by literal-minded vegans. Asperger's, perhaps.  ;)

32 certainly does not fit within a decimal system, so you can see why the Malian franc did not survive for long after that.  :-X
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #43 on: August 02, 2020, 03:41:39 AM »
The Cyprus coin series of 1955, with QEII on the obverse, had denticles on both sides.

In 1963, after independence, a new series was issued. This set had denticles on the obverse but an unusual wavy pattern on the reverse.





Cyprus, 50 mils, 1981.



Why wavy? Cyprus is an island, so is the pattern meant to represent the sea?





Cyprus, 5 mils, 1963.



Below you see the denticled reverse sides of some of the coins.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #44 on: August 03, 2020, 08:54:54 PM »






Bahamas, QEII. The 10 cents coin had a bead circle, despite not being circular.





10 cents, 1971.



15 cents, 1971.

 
« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 11:33:17 PM by <k> »
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