Author Topic: Beads and dentillations on coins  (Read 1474 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2020, 02:12:03 AM »
Guernsey, 10 shillings commemorative coin, 1966.

The coin has beads on both sides, and they follow the squarish shape of the coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2020, 02:19:44 AM »


Algeria, 50 dinars, 1993.  Beads are placed within the motif. Unusual.





But there are no beads on the reverse.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2020, 02:21:48 AM »


Dominican Republic, ½ peso, 1989.





Dominican Republic, ½ peso, 1990.


Some coins have been issued in two versions: with beads and without beads.

Do you know of any more?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2020, 02:23:14 AM »


Colombia, 1000 pesos, 2012.  Large and well-spaced beads on this coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2020, 02:24:58 AM »


 Yugoslavia, 1 dinar, 1938.  Bead-shaped denticles?

 
« Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 02:42:24 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2020, 02:30:15 AM »
UK Gothic crown, 1847.

Neither beads nor denticles, but an unusual set of shapes.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2020, 02:41:42 AM »


German New Guinea, 10 Pfennig, 1894.  Obverse: the denticles are slanted diagonally.





German New Guinea, 10 Pfennig, 1894.  Obverse: the denticles are straight. Why the difference, on the same coin?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2020, 02:46:18 AM »


UK, one pound, 2006.  The Egyptian Arch, Newry, Northern Ireland.





UK, one pound, 2007.  Gateshead Millennium Bridge, England.

Artist Edwina Ellis takes the idea of denticles and plays with it, in her series of bridge designs for the old UK round pound.





UK, one pound, 2004.  Forth Bridge, Scotland.





UK, one pound, 2005.  Menai Suspension Bridge, Anglesey, Wales.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2020, 02:56:13 AM »


Misaligned beads on a Gibraltar 2 pound coin of 2019 for the Island Games.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2020, 03:01:10 AM »




According to Wikipedia:

Tokelau consists of three tropical coral atolls (Atafu, Nukunonu and Fakaofo), with a combined land area of 10 km2 (4 sq mi). The capital rotates yearly among the three atolls.


For many years, Tokelau arranged the beads on the obverse of its collector coins in groups of three as a reference to its three atolls.

Do you know of any other symbolic coin beads?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2020, 03:27:27 AM »
Canada, $1, 1976 and 1977.

Two different types. One type has beads on both side.

The other has beads on one side and denticles on the other.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2020, 09:04:09 AM »
Mexico, 10 pesos, 2012.

'L'-shaped denticles on the reverse but none on the obverse.
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2020, 11:41:57 AM »
Misaligned beads on a Gibraltar 2 pound coin of 2019 for the Island Games.

The word REGINA is closer to the pill that e.g. the date. I think the beads are not misaligned, but the coin as a whole was not correctly aligned with the die. It may be just the light, but my impression is that the shadows in the area of D.G. are longer than elsewhere. Perhaps the die was incorrectly mounted at an angle? It should be hard to do in a modern press, but I am sure my granddaughters could manage such a feat as long as they weren't trying. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline stef

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #28 on: May 29, 2020, 03:04:35 PM »
Do you know of any other symbolic coin beads?
Some modern Nepali coins have 64 dots - they represent 64 Yoginies (Goddesses). I didn't count them, the information is from the catalog of the central bank (pdf).

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Beads and dentillations on coins
« Reply #29 on: June 06, 2020, 10:54:32 PM »




In 2004, the Netherlands issued coins with denominations of 5 and 10 euro for the 50th anniversary of the Charter for the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The coins depict both on their obverse and reverse a circle made out of groups of 3 beads. The beads refer to the 3 constituent countries the Kingdom of the Netherlands at the time consisted of (the Netherlands, Aruba and the Netherlands Antilles).