Author Topic: Shah Jahan Dam Mint: Ahmedabad AH 1043 / RY 7 Month: Farwardin (Aries) KM#206.9  (Read 122 times)

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Offline asm

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A dam of Shah Jahan, minted at Ahmedabad. These seem to be a very short lived series issued for a very brief period. The known coins are all dated RY 7 and we also have the series without month in the RY 7. So issued over two AH dates AH 1043 & 1044 in RY 7.

Weight 20.80 g

Amit

"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline abhinumis

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Wonderful piece!
Dr.Abhishek

Online Figleaf

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Agreed. Intriguing story also. Do you have any ideas about why they were minted?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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Agreed. Intriguing story also. Do you have any ideas about why they were minted?
Peter

Copper coins of Shah Jahan from Ahmedabad are all found minted in the AH years 1043 to 1045 across the RY's 7 & 8.


Copper was the means for the everyday trade. Silver currency was way to high for an average man to use for daily needs. Even a copper dam could buy a months ration for an average family. Most probably, the average trade was barter or may be the cowries or some such means of exchange.

Now the reason for the short mintage:
Story has it that with the abundance of Dams minted during the reign of Akbar, there may have been no need for his successors to mint copper. This appears to be fairly likely. However, the reasons for these short and sudden spurts of minting of copper has never been explained. It needs to be investigated.

My own take (I have not yet looked for evidence nor have gone through the records) is that it is possible that there was some royal activities in the area in these times - may be the appointment of a new governor (some one from the royal household) or the presence of the Imperial army in the region (necessitating the need of copper to pay the soldiers) or some such cause.

I am collecting the source materials and will be studying this soon once I have sorted out my coins of the other mints in the area. The interesting fact is that it is likely that Shah Jahan may have himself visited the area - or was planning to visit - since we have information on his instructions to stop the use of Mehmudis in Saurashtra area and establish a mint to convert these in to Imperial rupees - the new mint at Pattan Deo (Somnath in Saurashtra) operating in his RY 10 and subsequent moving / re-establishing the mint at Junagadh at this time.

Amit
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 07:12:28 AM by asm »
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Online Figleaf

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I think your speculation is quite realistic, a visit of a high court official or the Mughal. It would have left traces in the city's financial records - if these are archived. One can always hope.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.