Author Topic: Triskele!  (Read 24837 times)

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Offline malj1

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #105 on: February 26, 2019, 11:24:05 PM »
Envious too, but I'm an OAP  8)
Malcolm
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Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #106 on: February 26, 2019, 11:49:40 PM »
Envious too, but I'm an OAP  8)

An OAP with an IOM collection I aspire to!  ;)

Honestly, I never thought I'd own one. It went unsold in September, and I'd been keeping a look out for it since. When it appeared at a little over half September's starting price, I couldn't resist. Fortunately, no one else seemed interested. I actually jumped up and down a bit.  ;D

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #107 on: January 12, 2021, 05:36:24 PM »
This one took some finding:

William Callister halfpenny,  Withers 2102 (knee to A).


Online Figleaf

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #108 on: January 12, 2021, 07:57:17 PM »
That would be Davis 25, though he lists no variants.

I find the technique of incuse lettering in a raised rim interesting. Invented by Boulton and Watt, it was first used on coins of the Madras presidency in 1794. It was the reason why Boulton and Watt could take business away from the London mint. That mint recovered eventually, but this token shows that 37 years after its introduction, Boulton and Watt still used it as a selling point, albeit now for private customers.

The above story reminds me of the long series of bi-metallic tokens I am posting, while the modern version of that technique was introduced in Italy in 1982, now over 38 years ago. New has become cheap enough for token manufacturing in 3 to 4 decades.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #109 on: January 12, 2021, 10:08:39 PM »
Alan Kelly listed three types: Knee to A; Knee to B; and Knee between A & B. He sold me one that was said to be the latter but it appeared to me to be the same Knee to A.

Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #110 on: January 12, 2021, 10:13:47 PM »

I covet your 1815 mule - I've never seen another.  :P

I did see another fairly recently (Nov. 2011!) and kept the screenshot but no idea from where now.
Malcolm
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Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #111 on: January 13, 2021, 01:59:31 AM »
Alan Kelly listed three types: Knee to A; Knee to B; and Knee between A & B. He sold me one that was said to be the latter but it appeared to me to be the same Knee to A.

If it's on your site I think they're all the same Mal. Withers has the best pictures / description of the knee between I've found - ref 2101. The alignment of the top of the letters in PENNY is to the centre of O, and the Y is slightly low. I've never seen one. This was only the 5th knee to A I've seen - three you have, one I saw in ebay sold listings, and this one.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #112 on: January 13, 2021, 02:01:50 AM »
I did see another fairly recently (Nov. 2011!) and kept the screenshot but no idea from where now.

I got there in the end, quite recently as it happens.  :)


Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Triskele!
« Reply #113 on: January 13, 2021, 02:05:28 AM »
I find the technique of incuse lettering in a raised rim interesting.

Me too - I find it a really appealing feature which gives the coin a striking appearance. Got to love a cartwheel! :)