Author Topic: British dog tags?  (Read 735 times)

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Offline FosseWay

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Re: British dog tags?
« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2020, 05:07:36 PM »
I've found him in the 1939 National Register, living at 51 Victoria Avenue, Elland, Yorkshire, with the same date of birth, 20.8.97. He is a cloth finisher and living with his wife Leonore V Upton and three individuals whose details are redacted because they are still alive, presumably his children.

Offline brandm24

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Re: British dog tags?
« Reply #31 on: May 25, 2020, 06:44:34 PM »
It's likely then that he was a Canadian sailor and not necessarily English. Lots of interesting information to consider. I love it when a face can be attached to a piece of metal like this. It makes it real.

You guys always come through on these tags and I appreciate it very much.

Bruce
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: British dog tags?
« Reply #32 on: May 25, 2020, 06:47:05 PM »
It's likely then that he was a Canadian sailor and not necessarily English. Lots of interesting information to consider. I love it when a face can be attached to a piece of metal like this. It makes it real.

You guys always come through on these tags and I appreciate it very much.

Bruce

No, the Canadian guy turned out to be a red herring. The one Eurocoin found is your man, who I then found living in Yorkshire in 1939.

Offline malj1

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Re: British dog tags?
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2020, 12:03:23 AM »
Ah, yes, well done - that will be the right person alright. I tried searching on the service number but got nowhere.

As to "Dispersed" - this is a common term used about soldiers/sailors/airmen who are returned to civilian life after the armistice. I'm not clear what the difference between "dispersed" and "demobilised" is. It may be that people who were "demobilised" were still retained on a reserve list and could be called up again directly should the need arise, while "dispersed" people were returned  to civilian life permanently and would need to be redrafted from scratch, as it were.

The reason for discharge is "Shore on demob" - i.e. disembarked and demobilised. Basically his services were no longer required as there was no longer a war to fight.

My father was demobilised in 1946 following WW2 and placed on the Z reserve. 

Quote
The Class Z Reserve was a Reserve contingent of the British Army consisting of previously enlisted soldiers, now discharged.

The first Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. When expected problems with violations of the Armistice with Germany did not eventuate, the Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920
Following the Second World War, a new Z Reserve of soldiers and officers who had served between 3 September 1939 and 31 December 1948 were available for recall if under 45 years of age.

 Maybe dispersed means they are not required to come back
Malcolm
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Offline brandm24

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Re: British dog tags?
« Reply #34 on: May 26, 2020, 11:29:50 AM »
My father was demobilised in 1946 following WW2 and placed on the Z reserve. 

 Maybe dispersed means they are not required to come back
Ok, I didn't read the descriptions carefully enough. Many thanks.

Bruce
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