Author Topic: Jital, Shahs of Kurraman & Sind, Sayf al din Qarlugh 1239 - 1249  (Read 85 times)

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Offline @josephjk

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4.06 gm, 13 mm
AH 636 - 646
Mitchiner, World of Islam# 948
Obv: Bull left, Sri Hasan Karlak
Rev:  Horseman right, 'Sri Hamirah' above

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Jital, Shahs of Kurraman & Sind, Sayf al din Qarlugh 1239 - 1249
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2020, 06:31:21 AM »
The staying power of the horseman type is perfectly understandable from an economic point of view: generate trust by imitating a known quantity. Variations are OK.

In a well-known experiment, students were confronted with an object they were not familiar with (an Egyptian urn) and asked to draw it. Other students got the drawing and were asked to make a copy. After a few iterations, the drawing started to look like a cat. It ended up as a cat. The unknown object had turned into a known object by interpretation.

Likewise, if you start out with a bull and a horseman, people will accept varieties, even if they ultimately lead to a coin that is far away from the original, because what people see (and seek) is a design that is "what a coin ought to look like."

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline THCoins

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Re: Jital, Shahs of Kurraman & Sind, Sayf al din Qarlugh 1239 - 1249
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2020, 09:57:05 AM »
This is Tye#346. The text above the horseman actually is 'Sri HaSaNa KuRaLaKa". Though it stands out as a peculiar late design in its own it fits nicely in the range of coinage produced under different rulers from this area. In addition to Peter's comment; People will accept changes better if they are introduced gradually.
More info on this coin family in this previous thread.