Author Topic: Titanium as a coin metal  (Read 1908 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Titanium as a coin metal
« on: October 31, 2009, 08:04:12 PM »
As to the earlier comment regarding seeing coins struck, I have been round the Royal Canadian Mint in Ottawa, and also worked at IMI in Birmingham, who were the successor to Kings Norton Mint, and still used the KN mintmark.  Indeed, in 1968 I carried out trial mintings of tokens in titanium to see how well they struck, and still have the specimens we made (with an embargo on selling or otherwise disposing of them).

Very interesting! Titanium is a scarce metal, much appreciated in the war industry and AFAIK, it is very expensive. I wonder in what circumstances you'd want to make tokens of titanium. Are you allowed to show the tokens here?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline tonyclayton

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Re: Titanium as a coin metal
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2009, 09:14:56 AM »
Yes, although I am not allowed to sell them or otherwise dispose of them without permission.
That is unlikely to be granted as permission to give examples to the British Museum was refused!

I tried to upload an image just now, but the upload folder was full....

I shall try with another post after this one.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Titanium as a coin metal
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2009, 10:43:40 AM »
Frm "around here" there are two titanium coins - well, silver-titanium actually. The Austrian Mint issued these two New Millennium pieces:

Communication (2000)


Mobility (2001)


These are bimetallic pieces, much like the silver-niobium issues that came after the two. Total weight 13.7 g, with a silver (Ag 900) ring and a 3.75 g titanium pill ...

Christian

Online Figleaf

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Re: Titanium as a coin metal
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2009, 06:51:24 PM »
Sure, but that is a pseudo coin. It needs not take any logic into account. Tony's tokens were made by a serious token producer, so I wondered what the practical purpose of a titanium token could be...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Titanium as a coin metal
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2009, 07:02:14 PM »
@Figleaf: Hmm, maybe the topic title - "Titanium as a coin metal" - should be modified then. ;) I simply posted the image links so that others can see what Ti looks like in coins.

@Ice Torch: Some engine/motor, I think. Will look it up ...

(A little later) Seems that is an Austrian made V8 engine. Don't ask me about technical stuff when it comes to cars, but that is what the description says. Here is the folder (PDF, German, about 400K): http://www.austrian-mint.at/cms/download.php?downloadId=122

Christian
« Last Edit: November 01, 2009, 07:10:44 PM by chrisild »

Offline tonyclayton

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Re: Titanium as a coin metal
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2009, 01:53:11 AM »
Sure, but that is a pseudo coin. It needs not take any logic into account. Tony's tokens were made by a serious token producer, so I wondered what the practical purpose of a titanium token could be...

Peter

Titanium is inert and does not tarnish.  It is also lightweight and probably wears well.

It is also readily coloured by being anodised.