Author Topic: Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note  (Read 464 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note
« on: February 15, 2020, 05:58:11 PM »
Following up after the Field Day of last week, here are better pictures of the California Highway Patrol / 55 Speed Limit note. It says Series 1981.

-- Paul

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2020, 10:07:21 AM »
I was wondering why a speed limit of 55 mph (about 90, for the decimally oriented) requires a special action. I think the answer may be in this exchange. Can't read the last two digits of the date (labelled "series")

Peter
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Offline Pellinore

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Re: Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2020, 11:31:37 AM »
Naturally, one would ask what this note is for anyway. Was it given out with a ticket by traffic police? It must be rare then, because everyone would tear it up in a rage.
Anyway, here are some details of the note. I take it that G.B.E. are the initials of the artist responsible.

-- Paul


Offline brandm24

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Re: Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2020, 11:59:05 AM »
Thanks for the pictures, Paul. I was having trouble with the date but had guessed 1981.

I think Peter's link provides the answer. I remember when the 55 mph limit was mandated the main purpose was to increase fuel mileage. Apparently, driving at that speed gets the optimum gas mileage from a car.

I was also struck by the fact that this issue was so overthought by the government. A certain speed limit for certain conditions and types of highways and on and on. How about driving up a 10 degree grade in winter on a sunny day in Utah? There must be something about that in the regulations. I don't know about where you all live, but around here people pretty much set their own speed limit.  ;D

I remember years ago I spent some time doing subcontract work on a military base in Nevada. Nevada is basically a high desert state where nobody lives...except in Vegas, Reno and Tahoe. Anyway, the limit once you got into rural areas was "go as fast as you want to" It was just flat open desert driving. The irony was that the sheriffs pretty much looked the other way unless you were flirting with 100 mph.  They actually encouraged you...unofficially of course...to "hurry" along to your destination. The long tedious driving between far flung destinations was a real threat. The death of motorists was mainly caused by drivers falling asleep at the wheel and, yes it's true, hitting animals on the roadway at night. The wild cattle and horses would lay on the pavement at night because it retained the heat from the daytime. It was dangerous driving out there. I know, I did a lot of it.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2020, 03:19:32 PM »
I think Peter's link provides the answer. I remember when the 55 mph limit was mandated the main purpose was to increase fuel mileage. Apparently, driving at that speed gets the optimum gas mileage from a car.

Quite so. We travel a lot in other countries. That knowledge sometimes saved me from getting stuck without fuel. Once, the engine started stuttering as we drove into the gas station. Now, the phone GPS knows where all the stations are (and which one is the cheapest).

I was also struck by the fact that this issue was so overthought by the government. A certain speed limit for certain conditions and types of highways and on and on. How about driving up a 10 degree grade in winter on a sunny day in Utah? There must be something about that in the regulations. I don't know about where you all live, but around here people pretty much set their own speed limit.

My thinking goes in the opposite direction. We live in the age of computers, so why do we have tin road signs saying the same thing in all circumstances? At 8 o'clock in the morning, you don't need any speed limit on the Paris ring road. You are grateful for every meter you can move. Two hours later, the main danger is accidents and cars getting stuck, but you still can't go very fast. Only at 3 in the morning, you do need speed limits as drunk drivers are trying out the maximum speed of their car. The technology to determine weather conditions and traffic density (and even license plate recognition) is available and tested, we should replace stupid traffic signs by scientifically established restrictions, not determined by humans overestimating themselves, as they routinely do - there is plenty of evidence for that in behavioural finance.

The long tedious driving between far flung destinations was a real threat. The death of motorists was mainly caused by drivers falling asleep at the wheel

You don't need a desert to fall asleep. It almost happened to my wife on the tedious road between Paris and Amsterdam. Speeding doesn't help. The time gain is insignificant and the accident all the more serious (remember that impact = weight x speed). Our new car will have a device that gives a sleep alarm, based on eye movements. It also corrects automatically if the car is veering off the road.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Field Day result 2: 55 Speed Limit note
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2020, 03:40:55 PM »
Yeah, but the "good old days" were more fun. (Tongue in cheek here). Seriously, you have to love the technology, but my days in Nevada were long before any of it was available.

Bruce
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