Author Topic: JAHANGIR - SURAT - KM 145.15 - 11.26 Gm. - 20.25 MM  (Read 191 times)

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Offline jaspersaini

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JAHANGIR - SURAT - KM 145.15 - 11.26 Gm. - 20.25 MM
« on: January 31, 2020, 07:31:24 PM »
Sharing another eBay hunt. The condition of this coin isn't so good, but still, it's my first coin of Jahangir from Surat mint.

One side with a massive shift, with a dotted border.

11.26 Gm. x 20.25 MM

Your comments are most welcome!

Offline Figleaf

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Re: JAHANGIR - SURAT - KM 145.15 - 11.26 Gm. - 20.25 MM
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2020, 10:56:35 PM »
Congratulations. I know how good it feels to tighten a timeline collection.

I have no idea how difficult coins of Jahangir are, but the Surat mint should not be difficult for the earlier Moghuls. Until Calcutta took over, Surat was the only designated port for foreign trade. Foreign silver coins had to be re-melted at the Surat mint (though their seems to have been demand for the coins from jewellers), so it could always count on an inflow of metal to keep busy.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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Re: JAHANGIR - SURAT - KM 145.15 - 11.26 Gm. - 20.25 MM
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2020, 01:41:04 AM »
I have no idea how difficult coins of Jahangir are, but the Surat mint should not be difficult for the earlier Moghuls. Until Calcutta took over, Surat was the only designated port for foreign trade. Foreign silver coins had to be re-melted at the Surat mint (though their seems to have been demand for the coins from jewellers), so it could always count on an inflow of metal to keep busy.
Peter
Peter, Surat was not an important port in the initial times. There is just one coin of Surat in the name of Akbar which is dated Ilahi 37. There was no mint known at Surat then. It was not an important place in the times of the Gujarat Sultans. The first license to trade and set up a factory to the British was issued late in to Jahangir's reign. It was Jahangir who mandated that the Raja of Baglana stop minting the Mehmudis (which were, till then, the trade and accounting currency) and the Rupee coinage was made compulsory. Thereafter the mint gained importance. Mehmudis of Baglana are available (in name of Akbar) dated till 1027 (which would be RY 12 or 13 of Jahangir). Till this time the mint at Ahmedabad was the chief mint of the province.

Amit 
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