Author Topic: Seals and sealing  (Read 1427 times)

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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2020, 07:41:42 PM »
While lead is poisonous, it's not *that* poisonous! If it were, urban-dwelling humans would have died out from the fumes from leaded gasoline, which was only phased out in western Europe in the 1980s/90s.

I'm not one to worry about microbes, and I have the constitution of a medieval peasant and don't tend to get bugs, but if I were going to worry about anything from coins and similar items it would be general microbial life on piles of unwashed coins that have been God knows where. Certainly after rummaging in dealers' junk trays or sorting bulk lots bought off the internet, my fingers turn an unappetising black colour!

Offline brandm24

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2020, 11:30:37 PM »
While lead is poisonous, it's not *that* poisonous! If it were, urban-dwelling humans would have died out from the fumes from leaded gasoline, which was only phased out in western Europe in the 1980s/90s.

I'm not one to worry about microbes, and I have the constitution of a medieval peasant and don't tend to get bugs, but if I were going to worry about anything from coins and similar items it would be general microbial life on piles of unwashed coins that have been God knows where. Certainly after rummaging in dealers' junk trays or sorting bulk lots bought off the internet, my fingers turn an unappetising black colour!
Maybe, but you don't know how much ice cream I can eat in one sitting with numerous episodes of finger licking. It's all rather disgusting. Fortunately, I also have the constitution of a rodent, so I'm good. :laughing:

Bruce
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Offline gerard974

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2020, 03:54:02 AM »
hello
in one link for the history but i am sorry ,is in French ??? ???

Les plombs pour sceller au XVIIIe siècle – 1 – Les plombs de textiles –

h

Best regards Gerard

Offline brandm24

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2020, 10:56:07 AM »
hello
in one link for the history but i am sorry ,is in French ??? ???

Les plombs pour sceller au XVIIIe siècle – 1 – Les plombs de textiles –

h

Best regards Gerard
I had Google translate for me, Gerard, so no worries. That's a great explanation for what I have. Thanks so much for taking the time to look into my seal.

Bruce
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Offline gerard974

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2020, 02:20:26 PM »
Hello Bruce
i have one big problem with my English ,i see all the popic and when i can help i make
Best regards Gerard

Offline brandm24

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #20 on: February 29, 2020, 12:35:00 PM »
Here's another seal impression on an 1891 cent. "NY NH & HRR" stands for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. The line was founded in 1872.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #21 on: February 29, 2020, 01:13:34 PM »
But how was it used? Identification? It would have been easy to imitate.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #22 on: February 29, 2020, 08:00:37 PM »
They weren't used to identify a shipper or what was in a particular box, pouch, trunk or something else. They merely sealed a load for security purposes. If the seal were broken the cargo may have been compromised in some way.

The seals themselves were generally made from hard wax, tinned brass, or lead and fastened to the object being shipped. The seals were basically embossed with the pertinent information by several types of machines. They ranged from table mounted models, much like a large heavy duty stapler, to small hand held contraptions that resembled pliers with impressions on both ends of the arms. Others were hammer struck with a striking surface on one end and a die on the other. The smaller sealers often had crosshatched backgrounds which often show on stamped coins. These coins were likely souvenirs struck by workers. The impressions are always weak because sealers were never meant to be used on hard metal objects.

The major manufacturers of the time were the Buffalo Seal & Press Co. and the Keystone Seal & Press Co. in Brooklyn, NY.

Like anything else, they could have and were counterfeited. There are some struck coins that are obvious fakes, but they're likely from modern times.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #23 on: February 29, 2020, 08:26:22 PM »
These coins were likely souvenirs struck by workers.

Thank you. That answers the question, though I am amazed that anyone would want to have a souvenir from working for a railroad. In any case, this is a very interesting reference to what is apparently a whole class of privately punched coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #24 on: February 29, 2020, 11:05:04 PM »
Yes, this is an interesting niche of numismatics, actually, counterstamp collecting itself.

While the old seals themselves are rather common, stamped coins are quite rare. Probably not more than a dozen or two are known from maybe 8 or 9 different railroads. I've found that most railroad people seemed very dedicated to their profession, at least in the US and especially in that era, so I suppose souvenirs wouldn't be out of the question. I've even run across a few coins stamped by conductors, baggage masters, and others that were likely used for identification...officially or unofficially. A few were quite elaborate, but most just simple declarations of their profession.

Bruce
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Offline malj1

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Re: Lead seal?
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2020, 11:58:52 AM »
Here is a fairly modern Reserve Bank Melbne (Melbourne) seal ...can't read the other word.

From a box of banknotes that were being delivered somewhere.
Malcolm
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