Author Topic: An odd counterstamp  (Read 141 times)

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Offline malj1

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An odd counterstamp
« on: January 31, 2020, 01:49:45 AM »
This appears to be a British halfpenny from the eighteenth century although its much too worn to know for certain.

The countermark too is a puzzle it appears to read REMEMBER MEE twice on the obverse and once again on the reverse.
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: An odd counterstamp
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2020, 07:38:26 AM »
Bad eyesight can give surprising effects. On first reading of the counterstamp at left, I saw DISMEMBERMEE :P

Someone had fun trying out a new punch and found that not only do you need to hold the punch level, but also, the hammer blow must be level, or else, with a long, rectangular punch, either the beginning or the end will not show. As all the left sides are vague, I guess he was right-handed and unfamiliar with hammering coins.

My guess would be a jeweller by the name of Michael E. Edwards wanted to include a brass (gold-looking) advertising piece in the boxes with the stuff he'd sold and he thought of making the advertising pieces himself.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: An odd counterstamp
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2020, 02:38:51 PM »
I'm not sure what to think about this one. It does appear to read Remember Mee, but that soesn't make sense. If "me" is spelled incorrectly, then that's one thing, but who doesn't know how to spell such a simple word? ???

I've seen misspellings on counterstamps before, so who knows. So, I suppose the bottom line is who are we supposed to remember?

I have to think a little more about this one.

Bruce
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: An odd counterstamp
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2020, 02:52:12 PM »
On the "mee" - if it's old enough, it's not really a "misspelling". Even well into the 18th century I'm sure I've seen it spelt that way. On the other hand, once you get into the mid-19th century and beyond, I agree that if you're literate at all, you'd know the standard spelling with one E.

Offline brandm24

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Re: An odd counterstamp
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2020, 07:13:41 PM »
This reminds me(e) of a series of counterstamps struck probably in 1797 / 1798 known as Spence's Plan. You may be familiar with Thomas Spence. He was a bookseller, and dealer in prints and coins in London. He's best known for his political activism which landed him in Newgate Prison between 1798 and 1801 for what was considered his radical politics.

He made dozens of prepared punches with either single words or short phrases on them. Examples would be And, Blessings, For Ever, Land, Landlords, Peace, Plenty, Starvation, You Fools, and on and on. He would strike different phrases on mostly old worn halfpennys and pennies. One known combination reads "No / Landlords / You Fools / Spence's Plan / For / Ever". Given the small font size and the fact that it's probably struck on a British halfpenny, a tie to Spence is possible.

Unfortunately, I couldn't find any record of a "Remember" or "Me / Mee" stamp attributed to to him. This stamp does remind me very much of Spence's work but I'm not able to prove it...yet.

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: An odd counterstamp
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2020, 07:15:48 PM »
Bad eyesight can give surprising effects. On first reading of the counterstamp at left, I saw DISMEMBERMEE :P

Someone had fun trying out a new punch and found that not only do you need to hold the punch level, but also, the hammer blow must be level, or else, with a long, rectangular punch, either the beginning or the end will not show. As all the left sides are vague, I guess he was right-handed and unfamiliar with hammering coins.

My guess would be a jeweller by the name of Michael E. Edwards wanted to include a brass (gold-looking) advertising piece in the boxes with the stuff he'd sold and he thought of making the advertising pieces himself.

Peter
I know Miichael, Peter, and he says it's not his. ;D

Bruce
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