Author Topic: Unknown counterstamp  (Read 134 times)

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Online brandm24

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Unknown counterstamp
« on: January 29, 2020, 11:46:14 PM »
I thought someone might recognize the counterstamp on this 1853 English Halfpenny. I'm also interested in the flat spots on the rim. They appear to be "after market" but can think of no apparent reason for someone damaging this otherwise nice coin.

The stamp looks like a typical example of a "crowned letter" trademark such as those used by cutlers or edged tool makers. It is a bit fancier though so not really typical. The obverse of the coin has a circular mark applied over the Queen's portrait. It appears to have been made with a tool rather than a punch. In any case, I'd be interested in any comments or speculation as to an attribution.

Thanks everybody,

Bruce
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Re: Unknown counterstamp
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2020, 09:03:25 AM »
I presume VR is for Victoria Regina (I tried 5th regiment, it didn't work), keep in mind that the VR flanked crown was used on much more than post boxes. It was something like a stamp of government ownership. I believe it can still be found on some lamp posts in central London. Also note the crown's top jewel with the big X.

I think the damage on four sides of the edge was done by four big, tight, clumsy clamps, fixing the coin onto something flat. The "cloud" in front of Britannia's face looks like a bungled attempt to make a hole with a small drill bit. They should have prepared the coin by make a pit with a nail and a hammer, so that the drill bit would not have skidded on the smooth surface of the coin.

No idea what the M stands for and (Murphy's law) that's the key to full id. The klutziness, combined with the official-looking punch leads me towards people used to working with big metal objects, such as ship yard workers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online brandm24

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Re: Unknown counterstamp
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2020, 10:52:47 AM »
Thanks, Peter, that's good information that I would never have thought of. The stamp along with the rim flattening might indicate it was used to mark Crown property then? Much like the use of the broad arrow.

I mentioned the circle mark on the obverse of the coin. I think now that might have been impressed on the coin by its contact with the surface of whatever object it was attached to. I'll see if I can get a image of it and post it. It might tell us more about the purpose of the stamps.

Bruce
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Online brandm24

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Re: Unknown counterstamp
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2020, 11:03:15 AM »
Here it is, Peter. What do you think?

Bruce
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Offline malj1

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Re: Unknown counterstamp
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2020, 12:13:39 PM »
I have seen that mark before but sorry I can't recall where.  :-\  It is similar to the government or Royal mark.

Just to throw a spanner in the works in Australia the Victorian Railways also used the V crown R mark.

The Victorian Railways were government owned from 1859 until 1983 when it was privatised. British coins were current until our own currency was introduced in 1910.
Malcolm
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Online brandm24

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Re: Unknown counterstamp
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2020, 02:04:36 PM »
I have seen that mark before but sorry I can't recall where.  :-\  It is similar to the government or Royal mark.

Just to throw a spanner in the works in Australia the Victorian Railways also used the V crown R mark.

The Victorian Railways were government owned from 1859 until 1983 when it was privatised. British coins were current until our own currency was introduced in 1910.
Another possibility then...it may be an Australian mark. This is getting more interesting all the time. Thanks, Mal.

Bruce
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Re: Unknown counterstamp
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2020, 04:14:13 PM »
I mentioned the circle mark on the obverse of the coin. I think now that might have been impressed on the coin by its contact with the surface of whatever object it was attached to.

Agreed. Possibly a bolt.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.