Author Topic: Patani province under Thailand AH 1261 (1845) large tin pitis  (Read 280 times)

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Offline bgriff99

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Patani province under Thailand AH 1261 (1845) large tin pitis
« on: January 20, 2020, 05:22:15 AM »
Thailand broke up and annexed its vassal kingdom of Patani in 1831.   It became a number of provinces, each with its own local coinage.   This is Patani province which resembles contemporary Kelantan issues.   It looks like mostly tin, may have some lead.   Diameter 30.5mm.    Obverse reads Ini Pitis Belanja Raja Patani.   Reverse:  Khalifatul Mu'minin Sanat 1261.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Patani province under Thailand AH 1261 (1845) large tin pitis
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2020, 08:39:13 AM »
Great condition and beautifully centred. TFS. KM says it's "hammered". From the picture, it looks cast?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: Patani province under Thailand AH 1261 (1845) large tin pitis
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2020, 12:43:59 AM »
Lettering and features are cast in.   There is a question for Palembang tin issues whether some are struck on cast flans.   Kelantan are all cast, until the end, after the turn of the 20th century.   

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Patani province under Thailand AH 1261 (1845) large tin pitis
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2020, 07:59:59 AM »
I can imagine using flans cut from a rolled plate in a casting process. I cannot imagine striking on a cast flan, as the strike would break a cast flan.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: Patani province under Thailand AH 1261 (1845) large tin pitis
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2020, 11:13:26 AM »
Tin is very soft when freshly cast.   Considerably more so than lead.   Most of these coins have some lead added to stiffen them.