Author Topic: Bosphorus Kingdom  (Read 295 times)

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Offline cam

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Bosphorus Kingdom
« on: January 05, 2020, 04:23:42 PM »
Hey, I've got this coin today.

Weight: 14 g
Diameter: 26,5 mm

I think it is the Bosphorus Kingdom and would appreciate any info about this coin (ruler, timeframe, price etc.). I've never seen such metal (Bronze?).

Thanks a lot in advance!
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Offline Manzikert

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Re: Bosphorus Kingdom
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2020, 01:41:35 AM »
I believe it is a coin of Sauromates II (174-211 AD). I have found is this one http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/septimius_severus/_bosporus_AE2Den_Anokhin_623.jpg but yours of course does not have the head of Septimius Severus on the reverse. Perhaps nearer is 1248 Sauromates II Regnum Bosporanum AE

The metal is probably similar to the orichalcum brass alloy used in Roman sestertii.

Alan

Offline cam

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Re: Bosphorus Kingdom
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2020, 11:15:02 PM »
Thanks, Alan.

I found out that it is Denarius 174-180 AD, Bosphorus Kingdom, Sauromates II. The metal is Aurihalk. Catalog ref: MacDonald D.543/3
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Offline Pellinore

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Re: Bosphorus Kingdom
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2020, 01:12:49 AM »
Don't know much of this, but 'aurihalk' means 'gold-and-copper': orichalcum, brass. This coinage leaned to the Roman, it depended on it.

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Bosphorus Kingdom
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2020, 07:25:08 AM »
As the lemma you link to notes, orichalcum is basically copper with some white metal added to change the colour to yellow, reminiscent of gold. IIRC, in the Roman empire changing the colour was a way to distinguish denominations whose sizes were otherwise too close to be determined on sight. Compare the Elizabethan small silver, where on every other denomination a rose was added, so that they could be more easily distinguished.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline cam

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Re: Bosphorus Kingdom
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2020, 08:54:43 PM »
As the lemma you link to notes, orichalcum is basically copper with some white metal added to change the colour to yellow, reminiscent of gold. IIRC, in the Roman empire changing the colour was a way to distinguish denominations whose sizes were otherwise too close to be determined on sight. Compare the Elizabethan small silver, where on every other denomination a rose was added, so that they could be more easily distinguished.

Peter, thanks for the explanation!
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