Author Topic: Stick figures  (Read 86 times)

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Offline malj1

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Stick figures
« on: December 25, 2019, 11:22:43 PM »
I think Stephen Lowry 1887–1976 may have been the originator of the matchstick figures.

(b Stretford, Lancashire [now in Greater Manchester], 1 Nov. 1887; d Glossop, Derbyshire, 23 Feb. 1976). British painter. He lived all his life in or near Manchester (mainly in Salford) and worked as a rent collector and clerk for a property company until he retired in 1952

Here is part of one of his paintings showing a  market scene and another with a larger group of people shown.

See here
« Last Edit: December 26, 2019, 11:12:58 AM by malj1 »
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Stick figures
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2019, 11:45:51 PM »
I have two paintings, both were painted in 1871 and signed as "R.M.Rayner" these can be seen on a Dudley website RICHARD MANSER RAYNER (1843-1908)



This is one of them.





In the background there is a windmill shown a close up of the windmill shows it is is in fact just a couple of daubs of paint similar to the stick figure paintings.
Malcolm
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Stick figures
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2019, 08:27:28 AM »
Nice! Very different styles. In the Lowry painting, the figures give me the idea of a mass of people. They convey the message "there are so many of us, you can't ignore us". Contrary to stick figures, they are individuals.

Your Rainer is quite influenced by impressionism. The philosophy of impressionism is "if you want natural detail, take a picture". The painting is meant to be looked at from a distance. If you go into detail, it is to show the technical ability of the painter. The painter is able to filter out the detail and reflect only the essential, leaving it to your brain to add the detail, which is indeed what making stick men is about also.

Peter
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