Author Topic: Bijawar state , Ratan singh , Rupee , INO Shah alam 2nd , dumpy Flan and Crude style  (Read 180 times)

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Offline sarwar khan

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Bijawar princely state was located in the Bundelkhand region which was a subdivision of the Central India Agency. It was founded by Bijai Singh, one of the Gond chiefs of Garha Mandla in the 17th century and subsequently conquered in the 18th century by Chhatarsal, the founder of Panna who was a Bundela Rajput.

On the partition of Chhatarsal’s territory among his sons, Bijawar fell to Jagat Rai as part of Jaipur State. In 1769 the state was given to Bir Singh Deo, an illegitimate son of Jagat Singh by his uncle Guman Singh, the then ruler of Ajaigarh. Bir Singh gradually extended his original holding by force of arms, but was killed fighting against Ali Bahadur and Himmat Bahadur in 1793. The latter restored the state to Kesri Singh, son of Bir Singh, granting him a sanad in 1802

On the accession of the British as a supreme power Raja Kesri Singh at once professed his allegiance. He was however at the time carrying a feud with the chiefs of Chhtarpur and Charkhari regarding the possession of certain territories. Hence his sanad was withheld until the dispute settled. He died in 1810 and the sanad was granted to his son Ratan Singh in 1811. Ratan Singh agreed to follow the usual deed of allegiance. He instituted a state coinage on his accession. Ratan Singh was succeeded by Lakshman Singh in 1833 and he ruled until 1847.

Details about the coins :-
Ruler - Ratan singhji (AD 1811 - 1833)
Denomination - Rupee
Weight - 10.8 gram
INO shah alam 2nd ,
RY - 25
Condition - UNC
ON DUMPIER FLAN AND CRUDE IN STYLE.
The mint was closed in the 1890's.

Refernce - Barry Tabor in the ONS Newsletter #183 (The coinage of Panna) and Journal of the ONS #193 (The coinage of Panna, continued from Newsletter no.183).

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Offline Figleaf

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Nice write-up. Thank you. I am wondering about the plant with three dots at 6 o'clock left. Do you have any ideas about it?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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.......... I am wondering about the plant with three dots at 6 o'clock left. Do you have any ideas about it?
Peter
A p0ppy flower? may be? The area was in the middle of the Op!um producing area of the Malwa region.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline Figleaf

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Yes, the thought did cross my mind >:D Now compare the letter to the right of it on the two pictures. Is there such a thing as a khaccha rupee?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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.......... Is there such a thing as a khaccha rupee?
Peter
Not sure why you say that? The parts seen on the coin are different parts of the die and I do not see much variation. But of course, the quality of engraving in the interiors was not as good as in the original Mughal mints.......

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline sarwar khan

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A p0ppy flower? may be? The area was in the middle of the Op!um producing area of the Malwa region.

Amit
Asm sir this is not a poppy flower this flower ,the area was in the middle of the bundelkhand area not in the malwa area

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Offline Figleaf

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To illustrate my point.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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Here is how I see it.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"