Author Topic: Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis  (Read 269 times)

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Offline <k>

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Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis
« on: November 11, 2019, 06:54:19 PM »


Copyright of World Coin News, 16 August 1983.




My thanks to Figleaf, who sent me this cutting from a World Coin News article of 16 August 1983.  In 1938 and 1939 the Nazis invaded and dismembered Czechoslovakia. After annexing the ethnically German area of the Sudetenland to Germany, Hitler then split the remainder of the country into Slovakia and Bohemia and Moravia. Slovakia became a nominally independent state, but it fact it was a satellite state that danced to Hitler's tune. Hitler turned Bohemia and Moravia into a Nazi protectorate that was under tight German control and oppressively governed.

When the Czechs minted the war-time zinc version of the very small 10 haleru coin of Bohemia and Moravia, they secretly altered the design so that one of the statues on the bridge held its arm up in a threatening manner and pointing towards the castle, which was the residence of the German Protector. This tiny but subtle mark of resistance was secretly loved by the Czechs but went unnoticed by the Nazis.

Offline <k>

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Re: Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2019, 06:55:59 PM »
Here you see the original design on a 1934 haleru coin.

Images courtesy of Vcoins.

Offline <k>

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Re: Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2019, 06:56:57 PM »
Below you see the amended design on a zinc 10 haleru coin of 1943.

Offline <k>

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Re: Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2019, 07:04:14 PM »
Figleaf explained to me: "Google maps/streetview covers the Charles bridge".

Here, however, I am floundering and must ask for help from somebody who knows how to manipulate Google Maps.

Below I post two images for the meantime. If anybody can find more suitable photos, please do.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2019, 11:54:39 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2019, 07:08:49 PM »
Here you can compare the relevant parts of the designs.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Bohemia and Moravia: the 10 haleru design that mocked the Nazis
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2019, 10:10:12 AM »
I think I figured it out. The original reflects a view that actually exists. The 1940 uses a manipulated view.

The Charles bridge has a number of pillars, with arches in-between. On each of the pillars, on both sides of the bridge is a more or less religious statue, so that there are two rows of statues, all looking away from the water and onto the row of statues on the other side. The coins show only three of the arches from the water (the backs of the statues are towards the engraver).

I used Google maps to make the pictures. I could deduce which statues are on the original, because a) their silhouet by and large matches the ones on the coin and b) they are directly opposite the statues on the 1940 issues. I have not identified the group at the centre (image: old centre). On the left is St. Christopher, carrying Christ across the river (old left).

The 1940 issue uses the statues directly opposite (new centre and new left). The group in the centre is St. François Xavier. I could not identify the statue on the left. Both have an outstretched arm that points in the very general direction of the castle. On the picture "new left" you see a church sticking out above the roofs. It is actually on the grounds of the castle. Keep in mind that this picture was taken from the bridge, face towards the camera.

I think the view on the 1940 issue is across the bridge, deleting the railing and the statues shown in the old version. If the view would have been from the other side of the bridge, the left statue would have appeared on the right. However, I may have identified the statues wrongly.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.