Author Topic: Collecting Gulf states and Africa  (Read 2076 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Collecting Gulf states and Africa
« on: October 27, 2009, 03:10:53 PM »
As a final Note I find so many of the posts here informative and they have expended my collecting interest no end( Eg Indian Coins)
Cool!  :) Which Indian coins you will be collecting ,Austrokiwi? Indian coins is such a huge category that it's really difficult to concentrate on more than one theme at a time ::)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Austrokiwi

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Re: Collecting Gulf states and Africa
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2009, 11:38:23 AM »
Cool!  :) Which Indian coins you will be collecting ,Austrokiwi? Indian coins is such a huge category that it's really difficult to concentrate on more than one theme at a time ::)

Aditya

I have only just jumped in three are due to arrive in the mail two of which I have no idea on, I will post all three when they arrive.  My main interest is in the sultanates.  This stems from trying to understand the economic trade between Abyssinia and Gulf states in the 15-19th centuries.   As I commented privately to two members; in my main area of interest so much of the history has been written with an occidental perspective and I have come to believe a much better understanding can be found by understanding the Oriental and Asian view points. This includes understanding the numismatics from these regions
« Last Edit: October 28, 2009, 11:52:58 AM by Figleaf »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Collecting Gulf states and Africa
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2009, 11:55:05 AM »
That looks like a promising approach to me. You must have thought of it already, but there are some very interesting countermarks from the Djibouti area on MT Thalers and such to explore.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Austrokiwi

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Re: Collecting Gulf states and Africa
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2009, 01:28:02 PM »
That looks like a promising approach to me. You must have thought of it already, but there are some very interesting countermarks from the Djibouti area on MT Thalers and such to explore.

Peter

This I can't resist.   I was at a major auction in Vienna last month. Of 5 counter stamped MArai theresia Talers only one was likely genuine.  The faked countermarks are easy to spot but it seems that collectors don't care.  I watched a Hejaz counter stamped Paris minted MTT sell for €800.00   Now unless I am wrong the counterstamping of foreign coins by Hejaz occurred in the 1920s. The Paris mint base coin in this case actually dated to 1949. One of the rarest Counterstamped MTT Marked with both a Hejaz mark and a Sultan Murad 5th tax mark has recently been shown to be  a very recent (last 25 years) creation.    I would love to have counterstamped MTT in my collection but 80% of the coins in the market are likely "tourist" issues. Counterstamps are easier to fake than coins.

For any one with counter stamped MTT..............it is very important to identify the base coin, and confirm that it is of the correct period and even then you can never be sure that you are holding the genuine article.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Collecting Gulf states and Africa
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2009, 03:39:46 PM »
IMHO, you don't have to have a single coin in your possession to study coins. All you need is high resolution pictures. They are easier and cheaper to collect, but you'll miss the edge inscriptions.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Austrokiwi

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Re: Collecting Gulf states and Africa
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2009, 04:26:51 PM »
 ;D  In some ways your right but going from photographs often means you loose qualitative info from the coins weight.  Some times when reading descriptions of varieties and seeing photos I just don't get it then when I have an actual example to examine suddenly it all makes sense, there are other occasions when examining the coin brings into question the literature and photos. 

One thing I picked up from actually having the coins was the qualitative difference between an MTT of the late 18th century and an ottoman coin of the same period.  IN that situation I was able to imagine myself in a gulf states market traders shoes; the MTT based on weight and strike just seemed more substantive ( I was comparing to a Islamisbul Yuzluk)  I think that  in the 19th Century rupees would have also provided traders with a feeling of higher quality than the Ottoman coins that were circulating.