Author Topic: W. R. P. King  (Read 3114 times)

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Offline africancoins

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W. R. P. King
« on: October 27, 2009, 10:44:42 PM »
I have a few pieces from The Birmingham Mint Limited and got one more the other day.

W. R. P. King, the man on this advertising piece was Managing Director of The Birmingham Mint Limited from 1960 to 1973 - according to the book "A Numismatic History Of The Birmingham Mint" by James O. Sweeny.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Offline Figleaf

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2009, 11:00:11 PM »
This medal is in Sweeney's book (page 70)

The book ends in 1970. I could still correspond with the Birmingham Mint in 1984. It must have died not long thereafter. I wonder why they went under.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

andyg

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2009, 11:12:46 PM »
This medal is in Sweeney's book (page 70)

The book ends in 1970. I could still correspond with the Birmingham Mint in 1984. It must have died not long thereafter. I wonder why they went under.

Peter

They continued trading until 2003, producing latterly 1 and 2 coins.  The end was the decline in business after the introduction of the Euro.  More here
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 07:45:08 PM by andyg »

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2009, 01:06:08 AM »
Note the prominent 'H' on the reverse!

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2009, 01:30:43 AM »
I wonder if this will help.

I hadn't thought about searching for it, but it appeared under 'heaton birmingham'.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2009, 01:48:30 AM »
Nor to me, but my computer is well trained in lateral thinking.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline No longer here

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2013, 06:02:56 PM »
Attached is a copy of a share certificate purchased on May 6, 1969 for the The Mint, Birmingham, Limited.  Although not a numismatic piece, it is interesting because it has WRP King's signature on it.

Offline malj1

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2013, 11:10:49 PM »
Interesting, for me things like this add greatly to a collection.

I see it was just a little short of 150, I imagine the rest went in fees.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: W. R. P. King
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2013, 01:42:08 PM »
Not quite. The certificate was issued for 598 shares of 5/-, but that was the nominal value of the shares. If Ms. Bradbury actually paid 149.50 for the lot it would have been a coincidence: it would mean that she bought the shares at issue and that the shares were issued at face. An unlikely thing to happen. More likely, she paid a stockbroker 598 times market price minus fees.

A certificate is a gimmick to control share ownership. At best, it is used to assign votes in a general assembly of shareholders, at worst it is used to prevent shareholders from voting. Here, it is probably close to the latter. The certificate notes that Ms. Bradbury is deceased. Therefore it wasn't issued for a special occasion, but for the long term, possible to prevent a hostile takeover, more likely to make sure only the certifying agent held shares and could vote and that she could sell only with the permission of the company to an approved party.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.