Author Topic: Look what showed up at my doorstep  (Read 190 times)

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Offline brandm24

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Look what showed up at my doorstep
« on: September 21, 2019, 02:19:09 PM »
I was always fascinated by seeing an unusual coin show up in an unexpected place. I've seen old issue US coins, subway tokens, foreign coins from various countries, casino tokens, and any number of non-US pieces in change.

This 1985 Australian Dollar showed up in the till at a school cafeteria in Haddonfield NJ not far from where I live. Being half way around the world it was quite a surprise to see a coin from there. I don't recall ever seeing one from Australia before. I'm sure there's an simple explanation for it's appearance, but what intrigues me the most is the journey it took to get here.

It would be fascinating to be able to trace it's path here. The where, why and how of it I suppose. Some of the very early US trial coinage was struck on silver donated by George Washington so the story goes. For me it would be special to hold one of these coins and contemplate the history attached to it.

I'm sure many of you have had a similar experience. Please share your stories.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline THCoins

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Re: Look what showed up at my doorstep
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2019, 05:26:41 PM »
Nice find ! Many people would be displeased that someone had paid with worthless coins. It is far nicer to welcome them as a chance occurrence.
With the transition to the euro i once received a 1950's silver gulden in change. When i asked the cashier if she had any more of these nice old ones she looked at me as if i was some sort of freak. Further than that, a guy at the market in Amsterdam tried to pass me some turkish Liras in change. But he knew very well that he tried to rip me off, and i was not amused because of that. Never encountered an Australian !

Online Figleaf

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Re: Look what showed up at my doorstep
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2019, 06:53:43 PM »
My favourite if-coins-could-talk piece was my Northumberland shilling. It was struck at a time the mint did not strike any shillings, for a nobleman so powerful that he could change the mint's mind. It was received as a gift by someone who was notable enough to be invited to Earl's wedding and who was rich enough to let it lie around and not spend it. It ended up at Spink's at a price I could afford because someone had dropped it, decorating the edge with a chink. What happened to that person? Hung by the neck until death followed? Disinvited from future events? Engagement to be married broken in disgust? Picked up quickly and put back in its place and nobody noticed?

I can't even show you the coin. It was stolen from me and I had to give up collecting UK coins (but not tokens!)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Look what showed up at my doorstep
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2019, 12:14:08 PM »
Nice find ! Many people would be displeased that someone had paid with worthless coins. It is far nicer to welcome them as a chance occurrence.
With the transition to the euro i once received a 1950's silver gulden in change. When i asked the cashier if she had any more of these nice old ones she looked at me as if i was some sort of freak. Further than that, a guy at the market in Amsterdam tried to pass me some turkish Liras in change. But he knew very well that he tried to rip me off, and i was not amused because of that. Never encountered an Australian !
Actually it was a student who wanted to buy lunch but only had this coin and not enough spendable money to do so. To her credit she asked my wife if she would give her a dollar for it. Knowing my interest in coins, she agreed. The girl had her lunch and I my unusual coin. A happy ending for everyone.

I worked for some time in a drug store after my retirement and found that people were sometimes confused by "odd" currency. Mainly dollar and half dollar coins and redesigned smaller change. I think they were suspicious of some of it due to unfamiliarity.  The coins were confusing enough to them, but try to give them a $2 bill and the game was up. I accepted them but never ever try to give them as change. :)

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Look what showed up at my doorstep
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2019, 12:23:31 PM »
My favourite if-coins-could-talk piece was my Northumberland shilling. It was struck at a time the mint did not strike any shillings, for a nobleman so powerful that he could change the mint's mind. It was received as a gift by someone who was notable enough to be invited to Earl's wedding and who was rich enough to let it lie around and not spend it. It ended up at Spink's at a price I could afford because someone had dropped it, decorating the edge with a chink. What happened to that person? Hung by the neck until death followed? Disinvited from future events? Engagement to be married broken in disgust? Picked up quickly and put back in its place and nobody noticed?

I can't even show you the coin. It was stolen from me and I had to give up collecting UK coins (but not tokens!)

Peter
That's what I like about this type of thing. One's imagination can run wild as the possibilities are endless.

By the way, I like the way you describe basic rim damage as "decorating the edge with a chink." A very elegant way of putting it. :)

Bruce
Bruce