Author Topic: Metal analysis  (Read 98 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Metal analysis
« on: November 05, 2019, 08:43:17 AM »
We live in interesting times. Ingenuous new equipment has enabled non-destructive metal analysis. New data are becoming available. They turn the science of numismatics around. The new data provide insight in purity. The course of inflation becomes clearer and that means we are starting to learn more about the consequences of the policies of the leaders we now know mainly for their military actions. We are learning more about how people lived.

In practical terms, studies of individual coins are giving way to better analysis of hoards. Collections of coins by type are succeeded by observations and measurements of coins spread out in museums and other (semi) public collections around the globe. As more and more coins are brought online with full data, statistical analysis can be widened and old assumptions questioned.

My aim for this thread is to collect some studies that rest on metal analysis of coins. Please feel free to contribute.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 08:57:26 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Metal analysis
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2019, 08:50:57 AM »
Eeva Jonsson, Metal analyses of Viking-Age coins. In: Metal analyses of coins 2018:1. Stockholm Numismatic Institute

In the present study, the silver content of 155 Viking-Age coins was analyzed. The aim was to re-exam the traditional interpretations of the silver content of different coinages during the Viking Age, and to offer an overview on the subject. The main question is what level of silver purity was considered as fine silver in everyday transactions in the Northern Lands and what variation was tolerated? The second aim of the study was to find possible inconsistencies in the silver content.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Metal analysis
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2019, 09:07:59 AM »
FIB-FESEM and EMPA results on Antoninianus silver coins for manufacturing and corrosion processes by María Teresa Doménech-Carbó, Francesca Di Turo, Noemí Montoya, Fiorenzo Catalli, Antonio Doménech-Carbó & Caterina De Vito.

A set of ancient Antoninianus silver coins, dating back between 249 and 274 A.D. and minted in Rome, Galliae, Orient and Ticinum, have been characterized (...)

The results revealed that, contrary to the extended belief, a complex Ag-Cu-Pb-Sn alloy was used. The use of alloys was common in the flourishing years of the Roman Empire. In the prosperous periods, Romans produced Ag-Cu alloys with relatively high silver content for the manufacture of both the external layers and inner nucleus of coins.

This study also revealed that, although surface silvering processes were applied in different periods of crisis under the reign of Antoninii, even during crisis, Romans produced Antoninianus of high quality. Moreover, a first attempt to improve the silvering procedure using Hg-Ag amalgam has been identified.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Metal analysis
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 09:07:31 AM »
Trial Metallurgical Analysis of a Silver Coin of Bengal Sultan: Explore through methods and Interpretation by Syed Ahsan et. al.

The paper is a report of experimentation with two methods of non-destructive analysis. The sample used is too small for any conclusions, but it shows the potential of the equipment used. Good for a first orientation in non-destructive metal analysis.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.