Author Topic: 1797, possibly a coin weight  (Read 163 times)

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Offline bagerap

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1797, possibly a coin weight
« on: September 14, 2019, 06:16:01 PM »
I'm fairly sure that I've seen one of these before, but unfortunately, not what it is. Seller's images so unsure of size but approximating 18-20 mm.

Offline bagerap

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2019, 06:16:55 PM »
Did any European coin have a weight equivalent to 24 shillings?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2019, 05:07:16 PM »
Without the weight it is a guessing game. The horse reminds me of Braunschweig in all its iterations, but as the horse faces right, Braunschweig-Lüneburg is the most likely candidate. In that case, the M would stand for Mariengroschen. While 24 Mariengroschen is a Gulden and 1/24 Mariengroschen is ⅓ pfennig, Braunschweig did not have ⅓ pfennige in circulation and the Gulden was a Southern German monetary unit.

If that's an S, it is problematic. In 1797, there were no stüber or silbergroschen in circulation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline scroggs

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2019, 05:35:34 PM »
Could it be from the Netherlands a middelburg toll road token in lead?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2019, 05:43:48 PM »
I'd have loved that! Alas, a tad too early and 24 stuivers (a 20 stuiver coin is a weighty piece of silver) would have caused a murderous rebellion, even more so 24 schelling (144 stuivers). The Dutch are cheapskates ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bagerap

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2019, 06:27:09 PM »
And thus we delve into the numismatic arcana, which is why I love WoC

Offline Manzikert

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2019, 11:06:16 PM »
Two comments: first I think lead would be a very poor material for a weight, too easy to 'adjust'. Second, I think the animal is more likely to be a unicorn, certainly I see what seems to be a horn on its forehead.

I am reminded of the Kent hop-picker's tokens, but unfortunately a quick Google doesn't turn up anything.

Alan

Offline THCoins

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2019, 11:28:03 PM »
These are Dutch.  Seen them also with later years. The Middelburg tollroad was one old theory. More likely it is now thought that these were ships toll tokens.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2019, 07:34:53 AM »
Got it. Bakenlood, tax token for domestic shipping. M is for "De Mijl" en 24s for 24 stuivers. This is an early type. They come with different dates and prices. Google bakenlood de mijl to see an illustrative collection. The animal is mostly seen as a mule, possibly a bad pun on mile. The horn is a badly placed ear.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: 1797, possibly a coin weight
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2019, 11:50:25 AM »
This page describes the animal as a unicorn on the early issues (18th Century) and on the later issues (19th Century) it is a mule.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.