Author Topic: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands  (Read 655 times)

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Offline <k>

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Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« on: April 14, 2021, 08:44:05 PM »
We have a small group - mainly but not exclusively English - on the forum whom I call the penguin-eaters. They suffer from heptagon mania.

I am surprised that they have not yet noticed the heptagons from the Pacific Islands.

They can easily be found on numista, where you can now filter coins for shape.
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2021, 09:27:14 PM »
Thank you for making me look up the word heptagon. I have included the number 1 hit for your edification.

It seems difficult to me to get a worse series of nonsense issues from nowhere with an unmatched level of ugliness. Since I admire perfection, being incapable of achieving it myself, I compliment you on assembling a series of supreme worse taste. I am moved to tears by the sheer immature commerciality of it all and nominate all of them for coin of the year.

I will now go back to drowning my numismatic sorrows in alcohol.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2021, 12:06:43 PM »
Of course these pieces are known. Following the 50p hype, some companies figured that they could do it cheaper. So they struck contracts with issuers like the Cook Islands and Solomon Islands to issue heptagonal coins, similar to the popular 50 pence coins. These issuers are much cheaper to do business with and there are fewer restrictions as to what can be depicted on the coins, as these issuers are not British Overseas Territories or Crown Dependencies so there is no need for approval of the Palace to use the Queen's portrait. (Although, as we have seen issuers like Gibraltar, which is a BOT, are now finding ways to get around the restrictions, no longer using the Queen's portrait on some of their coins to be able to issue coins with themes that are not relevant for Gibraltar). There is actually a group of collectors who collect all heptagonal coins, and some also all heptagonal tokens and medals. I haven't seen such groups of collectors of coins of other shapes.

However, the main group of collectors restrict themselves to 50 pence coins, which are the most relevant. It is therefore that there has not been written about these heptagonal coins and heptagonal medals that are both similar in size to 50p coins, that some companies have started to issue in response to the 50p hype.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2021, 12:34:57 PM by eurocoin »

Offline <k>

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2021, 01:54:04 PM »
So which countries do you own heptagons from?
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Offline eurocoin

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2021, 02:08:40 PM »
Barbados, Falkland Islands, Gambia, Ghana, Guernsey, Guyana, Ireland, Isle of Man, Jamaica, Jersey, Jordan, Kenya, Mauritius, Mexico, Samoa, United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom.

Only coins that were actually minted for general circulation, none of the recent 50p-like collectors coins. And no, I do not specifically collect heptagons.  ;)

Offline <k>

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« Last Edit: April 21, 2021, 04:37:32 PM by <k> »
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Offline Mister T

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2021, 11:14:27 PM »
There is at least one pattern Australian dollar coin that is a heptagon too, though obviously a circle was eventually used.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2021, 05:16:42 AM »
It was for a proposed 50 cent coin.

Offline Mister T

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2021, 11:26:48 PM »
It's not that one - it was made in 1977 (the same time the Solomon Islands got a heptagonal one dollar coin).

Offline <k>

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2021, 11:32:07 PM »
Please post an image, Mister T.
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2021, 03:42:28 AM »
The one minted in 1977 was in Copper Nickel and was a pattern without indicating denomination.

The Dollar coin was issued in 2004 as silver proof collector coin.

Offline <k>

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2021, 11:28:19 AM »
Thank you, Pabitra. So the reverse design was exactly the same as that of the pattern 50 cents of the 1960s.
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Offline Mister T

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Re: Heptagons in the Pacific Islands
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2021, 08:22:07 AM »
Please post an image, Mister T.

It is the one posted above (or at least the obverse appears the same).

I remember someone posting an image of it from an exhibition at the Royal Australian Mint though I don't remember which forum it was on.