Author Topic: The reverse of the obverse  (Read 1729 times)

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Online <k>

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2019, 12:35:20 PM »
Interesting.

What would our members make of the coin illustrated below? Which is the obverse, and why?

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Offline brandm24

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2019, 12:58:07 PM »
I never asked! DOUBLE hooliganism now.  >:(  I feel a heart attack coming on.  :-X

I demand a $15 bill and a penny farthing (as in the bicycle) by the end of the week, or you're in deep trouble.
I've been in deep trouble for the past 40 years...Married you know. Still, I'm taking your demand seriously. Would 3 $5 bills taped together be acceptable?  If not I may have to enter a witness protection program and go off the grid. I'd probably wind up living in some horrible place in the middle of Montana. Fitting punishment for a double hooligan I suppose. ;D

Bruce
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Online <k>

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2019, 03:38:21 PM »
I've been in deep trouble for the past 40 years...Married you know. Still, I'm taking your demand seriously. Would 3 $5 bills taped together be acceptable?  If not I may have to enter a witness protection program and go off the grid. I'd probably wind up living in some horrible place in the middle of Montana. Fitting punishment for a double hooligan I suppose. ;D

Bruce

OK, it's a deal, anything to save your life. You've done nothing to deserve it, but I'm a very generous person.  8)
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Offline brandm24

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2019, 04:51:17 PM »
Well.............Please help confirm which side is the Obverse and which is the reverse..............and nay, this is not an error. It is an official issue of the BEIC from the mint at Bharuch, issued for some time (1825-1830 AD) which shows the Bale Mark of the 'Honourable' East India Company on both sides of the coin.

Amit
You got me on this one, Amit.

Bruce
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Offline CannedMeat

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2019, 05:09:38 PM »
If this coin was issued in the name of QEII the bust side would be the Obverse. But QEII is the subject, not the issuer, so in my view the Obverse is the side showing the country name and emblem. The queen is on the Reverse, and the side not shown is the Edge.

Interesting issue. The copper-nickel version had under 1000 made, but 14,000 were made in silver. None for circulation.

Interesting.

What would our members make of the coin illustrated below? Which is the obverse, and why?



Online <k>

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2019, 05:21:21 PM »
If this coin was issued in the name of QEII the bust side would be the Obverse. But QEII is the subject, not the issuer, so in my view the Obverse is the side showing the country name and emblem. The queen is on the Reverse, and the side not shown is the Edge.

Quite correct, CannedMeat. Papua New Guinea always shows the national emblem and the country name on the official obverse of its coins.

 
« Last Edit: September 02, 2019, 05:35:50 PM by <k> »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2019, 09:58:52 PM »
See: Obverse and reverse.
If one throws a coin in the UK in order to decide a matter, one asks "heads or tails?" 'Head' in this context refers to the head of the monarch on the obverse portrait. The 'tail' is a metaphor for the opposite of head. What do people say in other countries?

In Dutch you say either kop of munt or kruis of munt. Kop is head, munt is denomination (lit: coin) and kruis is cross, as in the short and long crosses on medieval coins. Kruis en munt is also used for tic-tac-toe, though a more common name is boter kaas en eieren.

In French, one says pile ou face, from the Latin pila (the lower die) and facia (face, normally a facing portrait).

See also the sleeping beauty problem. >:D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bruce61813

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2020, 05:30:34 PM »
I havever learned to speak Texan, as I  visit my sister in Houston.  But in the US
, heads and tails are generally used because of the presidential portraits.

Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2020, 08:12:06 PM »
I havever learned to speak Texan, as I  visit my sister in Houston.  But in the US
, heads and tails are generally used because of the presidential portraits.

Bruce
For those less "sophisticated" it's just front and back. ;D

Bruce....2 or too.
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Offline bruce61813

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Re: The reverse of the obverse
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2020, 12:57:19 AM »
 >:D