Author Topic: Swedish and Finnish token listings  (Read 1269 times)

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Offline natko

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2020, 06:19:03 PM »
I have found a book on Norwegian tokens by M. Øverland "Norske poletter og akkordmerker". It seems pretty well referenced with NP numbers often quoted on auctions.

Cannot find much further info, how detailed is it, was the subject just scratched on the surface, what exactly does it cover and is the book worth it at all. Maybe someone could help.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2020, 07:07:19 PM »
I recommend a PM to Scroggs with that question.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2020, 02:47:07 PM »
I'm not Scroggs but I can confirm that I both have a copy and find it useful. I don't have enough Norwegian tokens to know how comprehensive it is, though IME no token publication can claim complete coverage of the issues relevant to the topic. But I can't immediately think of a Norwegian token that I possess that isn't in the book. (If you find yourself in this position, btw, the first question you should ask is "Is it Danish?")

One slight disadvantage, compared to say the three big Swedish token volumes or the Token Book series and Rains co-operative tokens in the UK, is that it is harder to find your way around the book, especially if your knowledge of Norwegian geography is a bit hazy. I sometimes find myself leafing through the whole thing (though that way one learns stuff one otherwise wouldn't!) or believe that a token is missing from the book only to find it listed somewhere unexpected.

Offline natko

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2020, 01:38:39 PM »
Thanks for the input FosseWay. I know the problem of a complete token listings, coming from a country with comparatively many trade tokens. Best publication is good enough but it probably covers less than a third of issued pieces, with best collection that will ever exist will probably not have more than 10-15% of them all.

I have already found some corrections to the catalog by Mr. Sømod, which is probably known to every Danish numismatist. And found some unpublished pieces from the auctions, but that is expected.

Potential issue I see with the book us that seemingly every round(ish) piece of metal is immediatelly a token, even if it's advertising medal or whatever similar. That is the huge issue with our local catalog as well, so a collector needs to go through it and decide what fits own collecting criteria. And it's easy to make a mistake, as obviously there is no enough info on the issues to make a clear decision sometimes. Although I have not had the Norwegian book in hands, so I might be wrong.

Thanks again for inputs :)

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2020, 02:22:48 PM »
Potential issue I see with the book us that seemingly every round(ish) piece of metal is immediatelly a token, even if it's advertising medal or whatever similar. That is the huge issue with our local catalog as well, so a collector needs to go through it and decide what fits own collecting criteria. And it's easy to make a mistake, as obviously there is no enough info on the issues to make a clear decision sometimes.

This is always an issue. When we (Gothenburg Numismatic Society) were compiling the Gothenburg tokens book, we ignored certain categories of round metallic objects because they were easily categorisable. We didn't, for example, include dog tax tags or "lokalmynt" (local currency minted for charity or in connection with an anniversary etc.). Whatever one's personal view on whether these things are "tokens" or not, everyone knows exactly what is meant by a dog tax tag or lokalmynt, or can find a definition easily, and all dog tax tags and lokalmynt are easily identifiable as such.

In other cases it's less clear. Either we just don't know precisely how a given piece was used, or it isn't a given that all potential readers would categorise the piece in the same way, or it turns out that a piece wasn't a token by a strict definition but without the knowledge published in the book, many readers would not know this. In these marginal cases we operated on the principle "better in than out". It's also the case that many collectors who specialise e.g. in the tokens of a given locality or a given company will include objects that might not be strictly defined as tokens. I have numerous Volvo tokens, for example, which are definitely tokens, and would be quite happy to add tool checks or coin-like advertising objects from the same company for the added completeness and interest.

You also have to consider the readership of the book. The token collecting community is fairly small, especially up here in the relatively sparsely populated north. The community of people interested more widely in local, industrial or transport history is considerably bigger. These people probably do not draw so clear a distinction between a token used directly as an alternative to normal money to buy things, and an advertising medal: the principal point of interest is that it is issued in a particular place or by a particular company.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2020, 02:35:23 PM »
One perhaps obvious thing to say about the Øverland book is that it is in Norwegian. It didn't occur to me to mention this since reading Norwegian isn't a problem for me, but for most people I guess this might be an issue.

Offline natko

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Re: Swedish and Finnish token listings
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2020, 04:35:41 PM »
Thanks once again! Well, from a national token catalog is expected that it's in nation's language. Reading most European languages do not pose a problem for me, I guess for most, in a coin catalog. Information is usually given in a few sentences at most. Også, jeg snakker litt norsk og det er flott å lære nye ord ;)