Author Topic: French music and dance tokens  (Read 459 times)

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Offline malj1

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French music and dance tokens
« on: January 14, 2018, 02:25:55 AM »
I have uploaded to WoT all the French music and dance tokens that I possess (other than several varieties) ...in fact quite a large number, but now I need images from those held by other collectors here.

If any one cares to forward images to my email address which can be seen on my profile I will titivate same and add to the Wiki with © to your own collection.


Edit; of course the email link is available at left under my avatar.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 09:09:24 PM by malj1 »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Online Figleaf

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Re: French music and dance tokens
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2018, 10:50:07 AM »
Some of you may not collect French music and dance tokens ;) but those collectors could still find it worthwhile to pay a visit to WoT and see another section brought to life by Malj1's superb collection. WoT offers more information every week, as loyal contributors add pictures and details. You just never know how it is going to inform or inspire you. If you can add even only a single picture you can proudly proclaim to the world you are part of the team too.

BTW, keep your eyes glued to this board. We are already building a new section...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: French music and dance tokens
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2020, 11:24:18 AM »
I added an especially nice one today here

HMV's origins lie in The Gramophone Company, who in 1899 bought the copyright to a painting by Francis Barraud. The painting shows a dog, Nipper, listening to his late master's voice emanating from a gramophone.

In early 1899, Francis Barraud applied for copyright of the original painting using the descriptive working title Dog looking at and listening to a Phonograph. He was unable to sell the work to any cylinder phonograph company, but William Barry Owen, the American founder of the Gramophone Company in England, offered to purchase the painting under the condition that Barraud modify it to show one of their disc machines. Barraud complied and the image was first used on the company's catalogue from December 1899. As the trademark gained in popularity, several additional copies were subsequently commissioned from the artist for various corporate purposes. Emile Berliner, the inventor of the Gramophone, had seen the picture in London and took out a United States copyright on it in July 1900. The painting was adopted as a trademark by Berliner's business partner, Eldridge R. Johnson of the Consolidated Talking Machine Company, which was reorganized as the Victor Talking Machine Company in 1901. Victor used the dog-and-gramophone image far more aggressively than its UK affiliate, and from 1902 on, most Victor records had a simplified drawing of the image on their labels.
See Wikpedia for more.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.