Author Topic: Khilji dynasty of Malwa Sultanate ,G&G M057, Ghiyath Shah as heir, falus, AH868  (Read 146 times)

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Offline sarwar khan

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Struck by Ghiyath Shah as heir apparent.( AH 860-873/ AD1456-1469).
Obv :-  al-Sultan bin al-Sultan Wali Ahd  (The Sultan, son of the Sultan, the heir apparent)
Rev :- Ghiyath Shah al-Sultani al-Khilji. (Ghiyath Shah, the Khalji Sultan)
Denomination :- Falus.
The coin is dated AH 868 , AD1463
Ref :- Goron/Goenka M57
Rarity - Scarce
Weight - 4.3 gram

I am posted the coin with overlay

Regards
Muhammad Sarwar khan
Jabalpur madhya pradesh

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Offline THCoins

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Thanks for showing this one. I mainly knew the later square falus. Had never realized that there also was the "Khalji" part next to the date, so additional thanks for the overlay !

Online Figleaf

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Well done, sarwar khan. Those overlays lower the threshold for these coins considerably. Now, your coin can serve as a tool for education and encouragement.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline sarwar khan

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Thanks for showing this one. I mainly knew the later square falus. Had never realized that there also was the "Khalji" part next to the date, so additional thanks for the overlay !
Thanks THCoins sir , You are right these coins are available in very small quantities except as al sultan variety

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Offline sarwar khan

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Well done, sarwar khan. Those overlays lower the threshold for these coins considerably. Now, your coin can serve as a tool for education and encouragement.

Peter
Thanks Figleaf sir for your encouragement

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Offline drnsreedhar

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Adding a few from my collection. Date is 864. That "4" looks like a "7" but the fold on its right arm makes me think it is "4".
Dr.Sreedhar

Offline drnsreedhar

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Two double falus coins of the same ruler as heir apparent. The second coin shows its legend very well and has three dots for "th" of "Giyath"!! So, is it Giyath or Giyaz?
Dr.Sreedhar

Offline sarwar khan

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Two double falus coins of the same ruler as heir apparent. The second coin shows its legend very well and has three dots for "th" of "Giyath"!! So, is it Giyath or Giyaz?
Thanks drnsreedhar sir for posted your collection coins

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Online Figleaf

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The second coin shows its legend very well and has three dots for "th" of "Giyath"!! So, is it Giyath or Giyaz?

Interesting. What's in a dot? The "th" and the "z" sound alike in English (no clue as to how they would have sounded locally), but they are formed differently, the "th" mostly by the tip of the tongue, while the "z" comes off the sides, forming a narrow tunnel. Die sinkers can be sloppy with dots, but it's more natural for them to forget one than to add one, let alone three.

So how about this speculation? In some Asian cultures, a change of name is considered normal. It can be for religious reasons, e.g. a sickly child that is cured gets a totally different name so that the demons pursuing it will not find it again. It can also be to start a new period in life, as Temüjin, who became Genghis upon coming to power. The problem with a name change from Ghiyaz to Ghiyath is that it seems too small, but maybe he had already changed name on coming of age or on being named heir apparent? It is known that he considered coming to power as a new period in his life, where he would retire as a war leader and become an administrator, his son taking his place in his army.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline drnsreedhar

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Thanks for the post Peter.
There is something a little tricky about the dots on such coins. If the horizontal boat-like line is written without any dots, it is "b", with one dot above, is "n", with two above "th", with three above, "sh", with one dot below, "p", two dots below,"ya" and so on....! So it means a great lot in a dot, but as you well brought out, engravers are likely to make errors with their numbers. And ultimately we the poor numismatists fall prey to it!  ??? :(
Here in this ruler's context, we know his name as Giyaz, most of the coins show two dots and so read as Giyath and this particular one needs to be read as Giyash!! I was only bringing out a very interesting feature on that particular coin that is of interest to numismatists (but not the least to engravers of course). Thank you.
Dr.Sreedhar

Offline THCoins

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Agree fully on the trickiness of dotting on these medieval coins !
At first it felt as a relief to read coins with nice diacritic signs opposed to the kufic legends without dotting. However, i also found that the dots could lead me in a totally wrong direction. When there is scarce space engravers sometimes put dots not even near the character they should be with. Also some engravers seem to treat the dots as decoration, and add embelishments or other elements to fill the space more elegantly.
But as numismatists we like a good challenge, don't we  :)

Offline drnsreedhar

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But as numismatists we like a good challenge, don't we  :)
My reply is a very big YES. You said that.
Dr.Sreedhar