Author Topic: Demystification of Arabic gold coin  (Read 302 times)

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Offline awadyassin

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Demystification of Arabic gold coin
« on: July 25, 2019, 10:00:02 AM »
Hello everyone! ;D

I am new to this community, so this will be my first post. Thanks for approving me, I look forward to gain some knowledge about historical coins.

I have received this coin from my grandfather, and I need your help to tell something it. Unfortunately, I do not have any history on it, it looks like it is scripted in quasi-Arabic, and it has a dotted circle to it. The weight of the coin is roughly 4 gram.
It would be really nice if anyone could tell something about its history, where it was minted, etc. :)

A jeweler very recently verified that the coin is made of 23k gold, but does it have any value above that of its gold?

Offline THCoins

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Re: Demystification of Arabic gold coin
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2019, 10:20:43 AM »
Hi Awadyassin, and welcome to WoC.

I am afraid you will have a hard time searching for the exact origin of the coin. I suspect this is not an actual coin but a so-called "jewelers piece" which was made primarily to be worn in jewelry.
One reason for this is the pseudo-arab you already noted. Also there are some lines across the surface of the coin which give the impression that it was struck with a broken die (Die crack). That is odd on a real gold coin as gold is fairly soft and gold coins were usually minted with extra care.
There are some mediėval gold coins which were imitations of islamic originals with blundered text (often called crusader imitations). But these have a different design. Your piece seems to be based on a 19th century Ottoman gold coin.

But still a nice piece of family history !
« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 10:33:55 AM by THCoins »

Offline awadyassin

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Re: Demystification of Arabic gold coin
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2019, 10:42:37 AM »
Hi Awadyassin, and welcome to WoC.

I am afraid you will have a hard time searching for the exact origin of the coin. I suspect this is not an actual coin but a so-called "jewelers piece" which was made primarily to be worn in jewelry.
One reason for this is the pseudo-arab you already noted. Also there are some lines across the surface of the coin which give the impression that it was struck with a broken die (Die crack). That is odd on a real gold coin as gold is fairly soft and gold coins were usually minted with extra care.
There are some mediėval gold coins which were imitations of islamic originals with blundered text (often called crusader imitations). But these have a different design. Your piece seems to be based on a 19th century Ottoman gold coin.

But still a nice piece of family history !

Thanks for welcoming me and taking your time to answer, it's much appreciated!  :)

And as far as I am concerned these 'coins' used for decoration and jewelry have holes in them, which is not the case for my 'coin', it would not e.g. be able to go into a chain or sewed into clothes.

As for the second part I looked in up at it seems like some countries in North-Africa were very keen to replicate Ottoman coins. I came across something called 'Algerian Budju's' which look somewhat similar to what I have. I guess it is likely that my 'coin' fall into the same category of replicas. What is your opinion on this, and if it's indeed the case do you think it would have any historical value that adds to the value of its gold?
Thanks for your time and patience!

Offline awadyassin

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Re: Demystification of Arabic gold coin
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2019, 11:00:40 AM »
Hi Awadyassin, and welcome to WoC.

I am afraid you will have a hard time searching for the exact origin of the coin. I suspect this is not an actual coin but a so-called "jewelers piece" which was made primarily to be worn in jewelry.
One reason for this is the pseudo-arab you already noted. Also there are some lines across the surface of the coin which give the impression that it was struck with a broken die (Die crack). That is odd on a real gold coin as gold is fairly soft and gold coins were usually minted with extra care.
There are some mediėval gold coins which were imitations of islamic originals with blundered text (often called crusader imitations). But these have a different design. Your piece seems to be based on a 19th century Ottoman gold coin.

But still a nice piece of family history !

Btw my grandfather was Moroccan, that's perhaps an important detail I forgot to mention  ;D

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Demystification of Arabic gold coin
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2019, 02:31:41 PM »
The holed coins are normally brass or copper, certainly not gold. I think this piece was worn as a single piece jewellery, likely a pendant, fixed with a clasp. You can see traces of the wear caused by the clasp on the first picture near the edge at 11 o'clock, on the second picture near the edge at 12 o'clock.

The crack is quite clear. On the second picture, it runs from 7 to 11 o'clock. If its trace is made of metal on top of the surface, it is a die crack. If it runs below the surface of the metal (I think this is the case), the piece is cracked. This may happen if it was under strain (e.g. buried) or if the constituent metals (gold is always mixed with another metal to increase hardness; judging from the colour, your piece was hardened with copper or bronze) were not sufficiently mixed. In this case, you should take great care not to put the piece under strain or clean it, as pieces can easily break off.

I cannot identify the piece, but it is a good sign if a jeweller says it is good gold. Others will know more.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Manzikert

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Re: Demystification of Arabic gold coin
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2019, 10:23:50 PM »
It appears to be based on a sultani of Algeria, KM 66, or at least the obverse.

Your piece has the same design as the obverse of the sultani but on both sides, which is typical of the jewellery copies. It is actually too heavy to be a real sultani, which should only weigh 3.2gm.

I'm afraid we hsve to identify it as a jewellery copy of the sultani, but unusual in that it has been struck in gold.

Alan