Author Topic: UK Commemorative coins for 2021  (Read 1397 times)

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Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2020, 09:50:41 AM »
John Logie Baird trivia that might be of interest to soap opera aficionados.

He demonstrated the world's first colour transmission on 3 July 1928, using scanning discs at the transmitting and receiving ends with three spirals of apertures, each spiral with a filter of a different primary colour; and three light sources at the receiving end, with a commutator to alternate their illumination. The demonstration was of a young girl wearing different coloured hats. That young girl was Noele Gordon who went on to become a successful TV actress, famous for the soap opera Crossroads.

Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2020, 10:02:54 AM »
Encouraging that they’re marking the 50th anniversary of decimalisation.  Will be interesting to see the design.

The coin will depict a selection of pre-decimal coins.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2020, 11:47:02 AM »
The Baird "Televisor" that sold during 1930-33 in the UK for £26 is considered the first mass-produced television, selling about a thousand units.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2020, 01:23:13 PM »
The “Diversity Built Britain” coin sounds like a reaction to Black Lives Matter

The coin will depict a web symbolising the connections between communities across the country and the inscription “DIVERSITY BUILT BRITAIN”.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2020, 02:12:52 PM »
The proclamation dated 14 Oct for decimalisation anniversary, John Logie Baird and Team GB states:

For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “· ELIZABETH II · D · G · REG · F · D · 50 PENCE · 2021” and for the reverse either: the inscription “1971 DECIMAL DAY” accompanied by a range of pre-decimal coins; or

the inscription “JOHN LOGIE BAIRD TELEVISION PIONEER” accompanied by a depiction of a television mast emitting circular radio waves with a range of dates relating to John Logie Baird and the dates “1888” and “1946” aside the mast; or

symbols depicting individual Olympic sports accompanied by the Olympic Rings, the Team GB logo, the inscription “TEAM GB” and the date 2020; or

For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “ELIZABETH · II D · G · REG · F · D · 2021” with the denomination “50 PENCE” and for the reverse the inscription “1971 DECIMAL DAY” accompanied by a range of pre-decimal coins.

Why the differing statements for the decimalisation anniversary?

Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2020, 02:58:22 PM »
Noticed the same. Something odd going on there.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2020, 04:10:55 PM »
The proclamation for the £2 bi-metallic coins is:

For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “· ELIZABETH II · D · G · REG · F · D · 2 POUNDS”, and for the reverse either:

(a) a depiction of Sir Walter Scott accompanied by the inscription “SIR WALTER SCOTT NOVELIST HISTORIAN POET” encircled by the inscription “250TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS BIRTH” and the date of the year. The coin shall have a grained edge and in incuse letters the inscription “THE WILL TO DO, THE SOUL TO DARE”, or

(b) a depiction of the Invisible Man and a Martian encircled by clock numerals accompanied by the inscription “H.G. WELLS” and the date of the year. The coin shall have a grained edge and in incuse letters the inscription “GOOD BOOKS ARE THE WAREHOUSES OF IDEAS”.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2020, 07:39:20 PM »
The design for the HG Wells coin appears quite busy, alluding to the novels The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine.

HG Wells was trained as a scientist which, not surprisingly, made him an important figure in the science fiction genre. Some of his predictions have come true:

In Men Like Gods (1923), readers are invited to a futuristic utopia that's essentially Earth after thousands of years of progress. In this alternate reality, people communicate exclusively with wireless systems that employ a kind of co-mingling of voicemail and email-like properties.

He also imagined forms of future entertainment. In When the Sleeper Wakes (1899), the protagonist rouses from two centuries of slumber to a dystopian London in which citizens use wondrous forms of technology like the audio book, airplane and television—yet suffer systematic oppression and social injustice.

Visitors to The Island of Dr Moreau (1896) were confronted with a menagerie of bizarre creatures created by the titular doctor in human-animal hybrid experiments that may presage the age of genetic engineering. Scientists are working towards animal organs serving as long-term transplants for human patients, and controversial chimera studies to create human-animal hybrids by adding human stem cells to animal embryos.

Martians in The War of the Worlds (1898) unleash what Wells called a Heat-Ray, a super weapon capable of incinerating helpless humans with a noiseless flash of light. Six decades later the first operational laser at California's Hughes Research Laboratory was fired up on 16 May 1960.

Wells recognised the world-changing destructive power that might be harnessed by splitting the atom. The atomic bombs he introduces in The World Set Free (1914) fuel a war so devastating that its survivors are moved to create a unified world government to avoid future conflicts.

Yet we await the fulfilment of his futuristic visions such as The Time Machine (1895) and The Invisible Man (1897).

Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #23 on: October 22, 2020, 07:23:36 PM »
The issuance of a commemorative coin in 2021 for the 100th anniversary of Northern Ireland is currently being considered.

Offline redlock

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2020, 08:37:48 PM »
The issuance of a commemorative coin in 2021 for the 100th anniversary of Northern Ireland is currently being considered.

This is a bad idea on so many levels... ::)

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2020, 12:05:02 AM »
This is a bad idea on so many levels... ::)

Totally agree.
Northern Ireland was a partition for cater for the Unionist minority in the north of Ireland.
It sadly divided a country on religious grounds. No consideration whatsoever should be given to a coin to commemorate its founding. It could become a fuse to re-ignite troubles.

Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #26 on: November 12, 2020, 10:25:15 AM »
The Royal Mint will next year issue 3 further dinosaur 50p coins. The coins will depict the temnodontosaurus, plesiosaurus and dimorphodon. All 3 dinosaurs were discovered by paleontologist Mary Anning.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 11:59:21 AM by eurocoin »

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #27 on: November 12, 2020, 12:18:37 PM »
The Royal Mint will next year issue 3 further dinosaur 50p coins. The coins will depict the temnodontosaurus, plesiosaurus and dimorphodon. All 3 dinosaurs were discovered by paleontologist Mary Anning.

Many thanks again eurocoin for the advanced information.

Had a thought, following the sequence of annual issues recognising pioneers of science, that next year we could see a commemoration for Charles Babbage as it is the 150th anniversary of his death.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #28 on: November 13, 2020, 04:30:56 PM »
The Royal Mint will next year issue 3 further dinosaur 50p coins. The coins will depict the temnodontosaurus, plesiosaurus and dimorphodon. All 3 dinosaurs were discovered by paleontologist Mary Anning.

I didn't realise this until I read about Mary Anning's fossils, but, strictly speaking, her fossils are not dinosaurs.
Dinosaurs are characterised by having an upright stance, with legs perpendicular to their body.
Temnodontosaurus and plesiosaurus were marine reptiles, and dimorphodon was a winged reptile.

You live and learn!
« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 04:54:07 PM by Deeman »

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #29 on: November 16, 2020, 09:37:27 AM »
Some information on the prehistoric reptiles discovered by Mary Anning in the seaside cliffs at Lyme Regis. All date from the early Jurassic period, between 200-175 million years ago.

Temnodontosaurus means ‘cutting-tooth lizard’ from the Greek temno ‘to cut’, odont ‘tooth’ and sauros ‘lizard’. It is one of the oldest and largest Ichthyosaurs (meaning fish lizards) known. It was a particularly fiercesome marine reptile, an apex predator, growing up to 10m long and had the largest eyes (football-size) known of any vertebrate, surrounded by sclerotic rings (bony support), giving it extremely acute eyesight with protection against high pressure, allowing it to hunt at all depths of the Jurassic ocean.
The first scientifically recognised Temnodontosaurus was found by Mary Anning (aged 12) and her brother Joseph 1811-12. Joseph spotted the fossilised skull and Mary uncovered it to reveal the first complete Ichthyosaur fossil to be found. It was described in 1814 by Sir Everard Home, an anatomist with the Royal College of Surgeons.

Plesiosaurus, meaning ‘near lizard’, was a large marine reptile measuring between 3 to 5m in length. It had a small, short skull with conical teeth, very long neck, four paddle-like flippers and a short tail. Its neck could not be raised high and was constricted in its ability to sweep from side-to-side. Its conical teeth and long neck seemed to make it an adept ambush predator, living mostly on fish and belemnites (cephalopod molluscs).
The first specimen discovered by Mary Anning in 1820-21 in Lyme Regis was missing its skull. In Dec 1823 she found another one, this time with its skull - the first complete skeleton of Plesiosaurus to be discovered. ‬British geologist William Conybeare published a paper on the discovery in 1824. The structure of society at the time made it impossible for Mary to publicly participate in science and most of her discoveries were published by men with whom she collaborated.

Dimorphodon, meaning ‘two-form tooth’, was a medium-sized pterosaur (winged reptile) and was one of the first large animals to travel by air. It had a large, bulky skull and the species was unique among pterosaurs because it had two types of teeth like that of a mammal, several large pointed teeth at the front with smaller ones at the back. It was probably a forest dweller living on a diet of insects.
In 1828 Mary Anning uncovered a strange jumble of bones, this time with a long tail and wings. It was a partial skeleton without a skull. What she found were the first remains attributed to a Dimorphodon. It was the first pterosaur ever discovered outside Germany. Geologist and palaeontologist William Buckland published a paper on the new species in 1835, crediting Anning with the discovery.