Author Topic: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir  (Read 304 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Meritorious Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« on: August 01, 2019, 04:50:56 PM »
My wife and oldest daughter recently returned from a trip to California, and among the places they visited was the Muir Woods National Monument. Muir Woods is the location of a small grove of old growth redwood trees in Marin County, and is a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The park was named after famed American naturalist John Muir, and covers 240 acres on Mt. Tamalpais. The site was declared a national monument in 1908.

Although I wasn't on this trip, I've seen stands of redwood and it's "cousin" the giant sequoia several times. These are massive trees, and the most awe-inspiring things I've ever seen, natural or man-made. If you ever have the opportunity to see them, make every effort to do so.

Amazingly, the largest redwood tree stands 379 ft. high and has a diameter of 22 ft. It's estimated to be 2,000 years old. The sequoia, while generally shorter than the redwood, is a bulkier tree. The largest stands 311 Ft. in height and has a diameter of 40 ft. This particular tree is estimated to be 3,200 years old.

In any case, this is a souvenir medal My wife bought for me in the park.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 779
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2019, 10:19:40 PM »
I share your enthusiasm for those wooden giants and we are not alone. Just about any self-respecting European arboretum has a few and they occur in many National Trust type public gardens. Many are 200 to 300 years old now. However, a whole forest of them is something else again. The only tree that can match it in fascination is the Davidia, once rare, now just scarce, thanks to those same arboreta.

On my only visit to San Francisco, now decades ago, I had planned to go to Muir Woods. I had to settle for a quick bus tour of a nearby plantation instead. Good to hear it's going strong. Tourist pressure is becoming a worldwide problem.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 950
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2019, 10:36:42 PM »
Never seen one but would love to. I have worked with Redwood wood though.

There are a number of trees of interest to people that have an interest in trees  ;D

There is a tree in the US called Methuselah. It is estimated to be around 4,850 years old.
It is a Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) and lives in Inyo County, California, USA
Not the oldest but interesting.

I have an interest in wood as I do a little woodworking on occasion.
I do have 15 to 20 pieces of uncommon wood for small projects.

Someone needs to send me a piece of the Ancient Kauri from New Zealand.
It is around 50 thousand years old.

Dale


Offline malj1

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7 356
  • "illegitimi non carborundum"
    • Mals Machine Tokens
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2019, 09:52:21 AM »
Kauri is an Australian tree, a native of Queensland.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Meritorious Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2019, 11:42:40 AM »
I share your enthusiasm for those wooden giants and we are not alone. Just about any self-respecting European arboretum has a few and they occur in many National Trust type public gardens. Many are 200 to 300 years old now. However, a whole forest of them is something else again. The only tree that can match it in fascination is the Davidia, once rare, now just scarce, thanks to those same arboreta.

On my only visit to San Francisco, now decades ago, I had planned to go to Muir Woods. I had to settle for a quick bus tour of a nearby plantation instead. Good to hear it's going strong. Tourist pressure is becoming a worldwide problem.

Peter

Most of the redwood and sequoia stands are strictly protected these days. The giant sequoia is at particular risk because of the relatively small number that still survive. They only grow in small numbers on the western slopes of the Sierra-Nevada Mountains, while the redwood grows in narrow bands along the Pacific coast of Northern California and Southern Oregon.

I spent some time in the Sierra-Nevadas years ago, and was struck not only by the magnificence of the sequoias, but by more mundane features of them that probably don't interest most people. I was particularly surprised by the fact that their cones are only about the size of a walnut. One would think they would be closer to the size of a bowling ball  :o We were cautioned by park rangers to stay on the walking trails and not to wander into the trees. Apparently, their biggest enemy is erosion...they have very shallow root systems and will simply fall down if not properly supported.

I wasn't aware that there were specimens grown in European arboretums. That's a definite plus in their long term struggle to survive.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Meritorious Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2019, 11:50:21 AM »
Never seen one but would love to. I have worked with Redwood wood though.

There are a number of trees of interest to people that have an interest in trees  ;D

There is a tree in the US called Methuselah. It is estimated to be around 4,850 years old.
It is a Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) and lives in Inyo County, California, USA
Not the oldest but interesting.

I have an interest in wood as I do a little woodworking on occasion.
I do have 15 to 20 pieces of uncommon wood for small projects.

Someone needs to send me a piece of the Ancient Kauri from New Zealand.
It is around 50 thousand years old.

Dale

I'm familiar with old Methuselah, and have long been fascinated by it. Not a "pretty" tree by any means, but rugged and durable enough to survive in those harsh conditions.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 779
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2019, 12:48:57 PM »
If you have an opportunity (e.g. when you are a little early for an ONS meeting ;)), you may want to visit Hortus Botanicus, the herbarium of Leiden university. It was started in 1590 and has a number of amazing plants, including a number of different species of trees older than the US. It was started to grow and study plants of the Americas. At the moment and until 1 September, there is a special exposition of dried plants from the 16th century "En Tibi" collection, featuring Europe's oldest tomato, in the state museum of antiquities (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden).

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 950
Re: Redwoods, Sequoias, and John Muir
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2019, 03:18:19 PM »
I'm talking about the wood that is dug up from farmer's and other land which is in New Zealand.
Today the Kauri is protected but the ancient wood is not.
Swamp kauri - Wikipedia

Dale


Kauri is an Australian tree, a native of Queensland.