Author Topic: Cleaning a Galba bronze  (Read 1429 times)

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Offline ghipszky

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Cleaning a Galba bronze
« on: October 21, 2009, 05:31:01 PM »
The person I get most of my coins from came through and found me a very affordable Galba.
This coin is 27mm in diameter. I think it has some bronze disease and some of the letters are hard to read. I really need some help with this one guys.
Ginger

Mark what would suggest for further cleaning on my Galba coin.
Since he only reigned for 6 months, did he accomplish anything of significance?
Ginger
« Last Edit: October 23, 2009, 03:46:34 PM by Figleaf »

Offline lehmansterms

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Re: Galba
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2009, 08:51:05 PM »
Ginger,

Frankly, coin-cleaning is among the least of my skills - at very least, it's one I have only begun practicing recently, as opposed to decades doing ID's, etc. 
Now, for a generally clutzy person like myself who's never been given high marks for fine dexterity - or for that matter, physical grace of any sort - some of the best results I've had beyond that which can be expected from DW soaks and denture-brush scrubs were achieved with the aid of a stereo "dissecting" (ie: great depth of field) microscope at 5x or 10x. Anything more powerful is unnecessarily close and you are likely to "get lost" in terms of your orientation to or where you are on the landscape of the whole coin. A fine-pointed pin, usually held in a pin-vise, is generally the sort of tool you want to use.  Under this level of magnification, the point of the pin resembles a bulldozer blade and a very fine layer of encrusted dirt seems like packed sand a meter deep.  If there are voids between crust and coin which can be exploited for flicking pieces of crust off whole, they show-up as caverns or cliff-dwelllings under the 'scope.
Of course, it takes forever to do it this way - but that's the point.  If you don't have the coordination and dexterity of a brain surgeon, you probably want to do whatever is necessary to make the micro scale on which you need to operate to distinguish the often vague boundary between crud and patina seem as "macro" as is practical.

Mark

Offline ghipszky

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Re: Galba
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2009, 09:14:43 PM »
Coin cleaning is not one of my best skills either. I have taken a closer look at the coin in question and I don't think there is anymore cleaning to be done. Those shiny areas on the reverse have already been cleaned and the green areas are part of the coin.
Thanks Mark

Offline Alan Glasser

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Re: Cleaning a Galba bronze
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2011, 01:37:47 AM »
Ya' know...I think I would agree with Galba. it looks as if that coin has nothing more to give up from the surfaces. I personally wopuldn't mess with it any more.

Has anyone here suggested soaking in olive oil. THAT takes forever too...and crud can be gently removed with a toothpick I've tried it a few times with varying degrees of success.

Alan

Offline Alan Glasser

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Re: Cleaning a Galba bronze
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2011, 01:44:25 AM »
ghipszky..regarding Galba's accomplishments and history...go to www.roman-emperors.org/galba     There appears to be some good information there.

Alan