Author Topic: Large votive hoard of 4th century Roman coins in Lincolnshire  (Read 170 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Saw it in the Archaeology News Network blog today: a large crock full of Roman coins found, that was apparently placed as a ceremonial offering in a pit near the tiny village of Rauceby (North or South? It doesn't say), North Kesteven district, Lincolnshire. It was already found by detectoring enthusiasts in 2017 and then studied at the university of Sheffield, followed  by a further excavation undertaken by the county archaeologist - only now made public.

I didn't find it in the finds.org database, but there will be a reason for this.

The found consists of about 3000 bronze coins deposited in 306 or 307, following the death of Constantius Chlorus in York and the accession of Constantine. The accompanying picture shows nothing but ordinary, worn coins, but still, 3000 of them. I hope there's a public follow-up.

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Offline Pellinore

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Re: Large votive hoard of 4th century Roman coins in Lincolnshire
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2019, 09:44:34 AM »
... It was already found by detectoring enthusiasts in 2017 and then studied at the university of Sheffield, followed  by a further excavation undertaken by the county archaeologist - only now made public.


I wonder what's the reason for sending this out into the press only now. I didn't see a detailed report like one expects from a university, just that it's the largest hoard of its kind. Maybe just "frozen pizza news" that they stocked up to use when they want publicity for some reason.

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Large votive hoard of 4th century Roman coins in Lincolnshire
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2019, 04:23:42 PM »
I think the blog took it up only now because "On Thursday, May 9, 2019 the coins were officially declared a treasure under the Treasure Act 1996 at Lincoln Coroner’s Court."

I don't know why there was such a delay, but I seem to remember that while gold and silver coins are deemed treasure, unless proven otherwise, copper is not deemed treasure unless proven otherwise, i.e. the government had to prove that the hoard was treasure. Since, as you note, the coins are common, their only points may have been the sheer mass of the coins and the unique way (votive) the coins were buried. That's not a strong case. In the words of a former member: "how many Roman villas do we need?" Perhaps the government expected to lose the case and they dawdled as much as possible to give the archeologists the time to document the coins? Just speculating here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline EWC

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Re: Large votive hoard of 4th century Roman coins in Lincolnshire
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2019, 09:36:07 AM »
Maybe just "frozen pizza news" that they stocked up to use when they want publicity for some reason.

Yep.  I visited the Star Carr excavation a few years back

Star Carr | A Mesolithic site in North Yorkshire | Home

The group had already found “the oldest house in Europe” in a previous season – but did not tell us - the interested visiting public.  They saved it up for a press release.  Why?

Perhaps this subsequent matter might explain it:

“In 2012 we were awarded a European Research Council grant to carry out more work”

IMO archaelogist are ever getting more elitist and no longer much care about the general public.  For instance - a weight was found around 2010 off Devon - from around 1300 BC.  The oldest British weight by about 1300 years.  Has anyone yet reported in the press?  Nope

Concerning the matter you report.   Why suggest this find is votive?  Any reason at all (aside from the pure rhetoric of “it might be votive”)?

Is it because the guy’s boss (SM, I think), has an obsession with votive matters?  Is that because if we track back into the roots of modern archaeological thought we find Marxists - who do not like coin use at markets – because they do not like markets - at all.

Actually, they surely all read Karl Polanyi, who had a “holy rage” against markets  (I quote his wife, a Stalinist)

I think we should be told   :)

Rob T