Author Topic: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS  (Read 340 times)

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Offline ZYV

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THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« on: April 29, 2019, 04:43:50 PM »
4.62 g
18.75 mm

Please, tell:
- how it was used?
- how it can be dated (19-th century, as I understand, but more precisely)?   
My publications on numismatics and history of Golden Horde  https://independent.academia.edu/ZayonchkovskyYuru

Online Figleaf

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2019, 06:15:45 PM »
From the looks of the piece, it was part of an apothecary's weight set, though it is not part of their traditional weights. More information on the weight itself here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ZYV

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2019, 06:53:39 PM »
Thank You, dear Figleaf for the answer!

So, you think it's an apothecary's weight.
But I can't find apothecary's weights with same legends in the Internet.
My publications on numismatics and history of Golden Horde  https://independent.academia.edu/ZayonchkovskyYuru

Online Figleaf

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2019, 08:38:18 PM »
No, I said it looks like an apothecary weight. If you follow the first link you will see that this is true. This may be an indication of the maker.

If you follow the second link you will see that it must have been made before 1878.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline EWC

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2019, 09:16:18 PM »
Its (mostly) for use as a bullion weight.

If you look for images on line you find one just like it - from  South Africa,

I guess they were probably commonly used where people are gold prospecting

But a dealer in scrap silver and gold would need them too


Offline malj1

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2019, 12:00:25 AM »

I guess they were probably commonly used where people are gold prospecting


Commonly seen in Australia is this scale box from the Goldfields of the 19th century. unfortunately my one is lacking the weights however it may well have contained weights similar to yours.
Malcolm
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Offline ZYV

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2019, 07:14:01 AM »
Dear Figleaf
&
dear EWC
&
dear malj1,
thank you for the information.

So - it's scarce bullion weight before 1878.
My publications on numismatics and history of Golden Horde  https://independent.academia.edu/ZayonchkovskyYuru

Offline EWC

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Re: THREE PENNYWEIGHTS
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2019, 09:09:27 AM »
Commonly seen in Australia is this scale box from the Goldfields of the 19th century.

Thanks.  Seems I am not wrong about everything, all the time........... ;)