Author Topic: Akbar: Copper Dam, Salimabad Dakhil Ajmer, AH 982.....with color overlay!  (Read 274 times)

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Offline mitresh

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Akbar, Salimabad Dakhil Ajmer, 20.58g, AH 982

Obverse (reading from bottom to top)
Zarb Salimabad Dakhil Ajmer

Reverse (reading from bottom to top)
Sanah 982 Nahsad Wa Hastad Do

In a facebook discussion during Aug 2013 at the "Mughal Coins of India" group, a query was raised regarding Akbar copper coin of Dakhil Ajmer Salimabad.

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We have seen most of the Dakhil Ajmer Salimabad coins with AH 982 only. The translation of mint reads Akbar entered (Dakhil) in Ajmer and named it as Salimabad (If I am not wrong). However we have Akbar - Ajmer copper coins of AH 979 and 980 also. If the meaning of Dakhil Ajmer Salimabad is true how come the Ajmer coins of Akbar dates to AH 979 and 980. If not where is Salimabad? We have Akbar only Salimabad with date AH 98(x). We have also Salimabad coins of Akbar from Malwa region.

So what and where is this Salimabad and in the above context, it is more appropriate to termed as Akbar entered Salimabad and named it as Ajmer in 982??? Is it or what else ?????
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The reply provided by Shailen Bhandare to the above query is as follows:

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There are plenty of aspects that one needs to discuss here, I'll take them one by one.

1. We seem to be assuming that on 'Ajmer Salimabad' coins, the word 'Daakhil' refers to 'presence'/'entry' and 'Salimabad' as an alias of Ajmer - i.e. someone (Akbar?) had 'reached' or 'entered' Ajmer in 982 and was therefore 'present' in Ajmer, which was also called as 'Salimabad'.

2. Akbar in AH982 was not 'present' in Ajmer - I seem to recall he made a visit to the shrine after his conquest of Gujarat in 981, but not in 982. Soon after 982, his armies made Ajmer as a base for campaigns against Mewar. That will, however, not explain who was 'present' in Ajmer in 982!

3. But 'Daakhil' also means 'interior' or 'inside' as a noun and if the syntax and the meaning of the legend is to be re-examined, reading from bottom to top - it could mean 'Struck at Salimabad within Ajmer' - that is 'struck at Saleemabad, which is inside (the province/district/locality) Ajmer'.

4. This would effectively mean that 'Saleemabad' is not an alias of Ajmer, but a different place, located 'within Ajmer'.

5. There is no evidence that 'Ajmer' was ever called or renamed 'Saleemabad' - but there is a indeed a large town named 'Salimabad' about 30 km North of Ajmer!

6. Thus, if we consider this place to be the minting place, the legend on the coin would make better sense. As coins with this mintname are only sporadically known, it is plausible that it was a mint run for short episodes when copper ore was purified locally rather than transferring it on to a larger/productive mint like Ajmer proper.

7. This would make sense - but it still leaves some questions:

A. Why was this 'locative suffix' dropped in case of later issues, which have only Salimabad?

B. Are the 'Malwa'-like coins struck at the same mint, or are there two different 'Salimabads', one in Malwa and one near Ajmer?

C. And from this question - we can also ask, was 'Salimabad' of the 'Malwa'-type coins, and the 'Salimabad' w/o 'Daakhil Ajmer' are struck at the same place - a 'Salimabad' which was different than the one near Ajmer?

8. The same word 'Daakhil' is appended with 'Chitor' on coins struck at 'Akbarpur' in the same year AH982. As with the case of Ajmer, there is no evidence that Chitor was ever renamed as 'Akbarpur' - could it be that here too, we take the meaning of the legend as 'Struck at Akbarpur, which is inside (the province/district/locality) Chitor'? Unlike 'Salimabad', no town named 'Akbarpur' presently survives near Chitor.
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Offline mitresh

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Obverse (reading from bottom to top)
Zarb Salimabad Dakhil Ajmer

Zarb (pink)
Salim (green)
Abad (red)
Dakhil (blue)
Ajmer (orange)
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Offline mitresh

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Reverse (reading from bottom to top)
Sanah 982 Nahsad Wa Hastad Do

Sanah (green)
982 (red)
Nahsad (900) (orange)
Wa (and) (yellow)
Hastad (80) (blue)
Do (2) (green)
mint mark (purple)
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Offline Figleaf

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Wow! Not only a fine discussion, but also a great fun overlay. Thank you, Mitresh. Such an interesting coin indeed deserves a full explanation of what is on it. The emotional side of my brain immediately starts yelling "I want one", until the rational side calms it down. :)

7. This would make sense - but it still leaves some questions:

A. Why was this 'locative suffix' dropped in case of later issues, which have only Salimabad?

This one seems relatively easy to me. As the numismatic history of this coin shows, the original legend could be misinterpreted as "Akbar entered (Dakhil) in Ajmer and named it as Salimabad". There is no reason to assume only coin collectors would make this mistake centuries later. Therefore, the original legend was found to be unsuitable and replaced by something unambiguous.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mitresh

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Thanks Peter. Your explanation is plausible as before acquiring the coin, I was also under the impression that 'Dakhil' mean 'entered' so it is easy to draw an erroreneous conclusion unless the underlying facts in its proper context is also understood.

This is probably an apt example of "Substance over Form"!!
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