Author Topic: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019  (Read 122 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online milkshakespeare

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 101
Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« on: April 12, 2019, 04:53:18 PM »
Kazakhstan is going to issue a new series of circulating coins in 2019. As far as I understand, the denominations of the new coins will be same as the current series since 1997-2004, ie. 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 tenge. So far I have no precise information about the details of their designs or materials, but the change is most likely linked to the fact that Kazakhstan is sadly replacing the current Cyrillic ortography of the Kazakh language with a version of the Latin alphabet by 2025.

Offline eurocoin

  • Indexer
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 895
Re: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2019, 06:00:51 PM »
Every step towards de-russification is of course one in the right direction.

Please keep us updated on this.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19 738

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 238
Re: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2019, 09:14:12 PM »
It is too simple to write off the change of writing system as a political, anti-Russia move. In fact, Kazakstan is quite prepared to work with Russia, as long as its independence is not coming into question.

Kazakstan is a neighbour of Uzbekistan; the history of the two show many parallels. This area was constantly coveted by its neighbours as well as by empire builders. They were invaded or occupied by Macedonians, Persians, Turkic people, Mongols and Russians with generous dollops of British interference from the "Great Game" to the first world war. All of them left deep cultural traces. Most of their coins are in Arabic script, but you will find coins with Greek, Bactrian, Chinese and Cyrillic script also.

When a country becomes independent, it needs to build a feeling of belonging among its population. That does not stop with common political control (if any) and institutions. You want to build a language, culture and history that all groups can accept as giving them their rightful place. Consider the example of Israel. It started with people that had only an ancient common history and a religion-based culture, with groups coming from Germany and from Yemen. It was imperative to revive the Hebrew language and the script went with it. This fed into creating a national culture that is clearly neither German nor Yemenite.

So it is with Kazakstan. According to Wikipedia, the country houses 131 ethnicities. Russian overlordship lasted less than 100 years of a rich Kazakh history. Yet, Kazakh and Russian are both official languages. However, the most important ethnic group are the Kazakhs (63%), followed by Russians (24%). Kazakh is a Turkic language, written in Latin characters.

Nevertheless, we may have to wait and see what the legends look like. English speakers in particular tend to think of Latin script in monobloc terms. In reality, it is an over-simplistic script that has no single character for sounds that are normal in specific languages (it cannot accommodate many English diphthongs with a single character either). The void is filled with special characters (Iceland has some interesting ones) and diacritical marks. Turkish is replete with the latter. If some of these characters are incorporated in the legends (there are a few in the Kazakh language), there may well be a case for calling the script Turkic, rather than Latin.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline quaziright

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
Re: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2019, 09:55:09 PM »
I don't see the value of this change in script to Kazakh people in general. It would be useful if it was meant to push up literacy and education rates as was the case in Turkey in the 1920's when Ataturk enacted language reforms as part of greater social changes to try to bring turks into the 20th century atleast in his view
And then language reforms can also completely fail as with the case in Pakistan where the govt decided to make Urdu the national language at the expense of local language and culture, all in an act to supposedly unite the people under an Islamic identity, that was a colossal failure with the emergence of independent Bangladesh and the constant inter-ethnic tensions between the powerful elite punjabese lobby versus the rest of the country such as in Balochistan and the Pashtuns in the afghan border regions.
Israel and Hebrew is unique in that it is a relative success and especially because of the constant fear of its citizens of being the outsider surrounded by neighbours who wish the state didn't exist. But then again, the whole hebrew experiment is endangered with the Russian influence. How ironic

 

Online milkshakespeare

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 101
Re: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2019, 10:12:06 PM »
Every step towards de-russification is of course one in the right direction.

In a country where most of the citizens are Russians or Russian speakers?

A reform like this would have been understandable right after when Kazakhstan became independent in 1991. Now there is no real need for it any more and such a change is only a major disturbance!

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 238
Re: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2019, 11:26:32 PM »
In a country where most of the citizens are Russians or Russian speakers?

Russians are about 20% of the population. The official policy is to promote Kazakh and abandon Cyrillic by 2025. If the situation can be compared with that in Uzbekistan, older generations speak Russian, younger generations use Uzbek, another Turkic language. With time, the role of Russian will therefore steadily diminish.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pabitra

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 069
Re: Kazakhstan, new series of circulating coins in 2019
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2019, 06:51:50 AM »

And then language reforms can also completely fail as with the case in Pakistan where the govt decided to make Urdu the national language at the expense of local language and culture, all in an act to supposedly unite the people under an Islamic identity, that was a colossal failure with the emergence of independent Bangladesh and the constant inter-ethnic tensions between the powerful elite punjabese lobby versus the rest of the country such as in Balochistan and the Pashtuns in the afghan border regions.


If I am not mistaken, there was no written language in area which is now Pakistan. Pushtu, Sindhi, Punjabi were are using Persian script, duly modified for local pronunciation.
Bangla was a proper language and was given full importance till Bangladesh separated and till about 1973, all coins carried both Urdu and Bangla ( and sometimes English ).

The choice of Urdu was by migrants from India, who migrated from North India and provided top political leadership of Pakistan in first decade after formation. Over a period of 7 decades, Urdu has become accepted and has no competition from Punjabi in official matters.