Author Topic: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH  (Read 152 times)

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Offline capnbirdseye

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Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« on: April 08, 2019, 10:35:39 AM »
Another identified  from my lot :-  Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, 739-746 AH

Mardin mint, 741 AH

1.40g
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 07:08:33 PM by THCoins »
Vic

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2019, 09:49:58 AM »
Congratulations. Impressive coin. That me be the earliest coin I have seen with the "carpet beater" symbol (9 o' clock right picture). It looks like a clan tamgha. That would jive nicely with its use by the Mughals/Mongols.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline altaycoins

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2019, 02:49:59 PM »
Congratulations. Impressive coin. That me be the earliest coin I have seen with the "carpet beater" symbol (9 o' clock right picture). It looks like a clan tamgha. That would jive nicely with its use by the Mughals/Mongols.

It is certainly not a tamgha. Generally we see the crescent shaped tamgha on the coins of Hulagu and Abaqa, more rarely on Arghun(not Hulagu's but tamgha of Mongke).


It is known as "saadet" knot (saadet in Turkish means happiness, bliss, welfare) which is used as a charm I suppose.

Earlier than Sulayman, it is used in Arghun's my favorite type, next to the sun and hawk:


and we come across it on most of the coinage of Abu Said, especially on type D and H:


Offline aws22

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2019, 09:44:14 AM »
Dear Vic, your coin details:
Mongols of Persia, Ilkhans, Sultan Sulayman Khan, AR 2 Dirham, 741 AH, Mardin mint (AH 739-746/1339-1346 AD)
First photo:
Field
السلطان العادل al-Sultan al-Adil
سليمان خان   Sulayman Khan
خلد الله ملكه  Khallad Allah Mulkahu
Margin: Looped ornamented hexagon, reading anticlockwise:
12 O’clock في سنه   Fi Sanah
10 O’clock أحد      Ahad
8 O’clock  واربعين   wa Arba’een
6 O’clock وسبعمائه  wa Sabu’maia
4 O’clock ضرب     Zarb
2 O’clock     Not visible (mint possibly ماردين Mardin)
Second photo:
Field inside inner circle:
لا اله الا  La Ilah Illa
الله       Allah
Margin:
12 O’clock الله    Allah
9 O’clock محمد     Muhammad
3 O’clock رسوله   Rasulahu
6 O’clock الامين   al-Ameen

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2019, 10:25:32 AM »
Thank you Maythem for the wonderful description, also Yijit for the beautiful examples of coin types
Vic

Offline aws22

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2019, 10:37:24 AM »
Thank you Vic

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2019, 12:07:29 PM »
I see altaycoins and Maythem agreeing on that it's an ornament. Very interesting. I know similar ornaments from Korea and - to a lesser extent - China. They are made from one piece of rope and generally end in a tassel. You may find miniatures in Chinese fluffware shops to hang from your car rearview mirror just in case you absolutely need something dangling in your peripheral view when driving.

I am not altogether happy with that explanation. If I could describe the ornament discussed here as a six-loop, Akbar and some of his successors use a two-loop on their coins. The question arises why individual rulers use one knot and not the many other knot forms available to them. It looks like there is a connection between the individual(s) and the knot.

In that connection, consider that military uniforms hadn't been invented yet. How did soldiers distinguish friend from foe in the heat of a battle? Yes, banners were known, but they are good for groups of fighters only. IIRC, 6th century Celts were already painting marks (inspired by the banners) on their shields.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline aws22

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2019, 12:19:18 PM »
Thank you Peter for your useful comments.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline altaycoins

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2019, 02:11:25 PM »
Well I am not very experienced with the coinage of far east but this knot is a very common motif in Anatolia and used by the rulers almost exclusively. You can see it on the coins from beylik coinage to ottomans. And I cannot correlate the number of loops to anything. Simple form is the Solomon's knot and you can derive as much as you can from that basic figure. For example there is more loops in the following mangir from Ottomans (an 12 g giant)


You can even see a similar motif in the modern Turkish coinage.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2019, 02:59:19 PM »
Eye-popping coin. I am not used to seeing them so sharp and well struck. TFP! I agree that the key is not in the number of loops. Akbar wasn't modest enough to have used only two loops if it were. It's just my way to distinguish different knots.

Why would the use be largely confined to rulers in Anatolia? Is it considered a symbol of something?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline altaycoins

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Re: Ilkhans, AR 2 dirhams, Suleyman Khan, Mardin, 741 AH
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2019, 03:12:07 PM »
As I mentioned in my earlier post
It is known as "saadet" knot (saadet in Turkish means happiness, bliss, welfare) which is used as a charm I suppose.
It is also the symbol of unity and interconnection which very well fit to the geopolitical and antropological situation of Anatolia.
I have found an article that states that this symbol is used in Anatolia since antiquity but I don't have an example from ancient coins at the moment.