Author Topic: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens  (Read 163 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« on: April 04, 2019, 02:54:25 PM »
In my coffee machine tokens quest, I picked up some restaurant tokens also. Kooij puts the coffee machine and restaurant tokens together, but I tried to separate out the coffee machine tokens.

Just in case someone will one day be motivated to do a section on the canteen and restaurant tokens on WoT, I will present what I got in this thread with pictures ready to be inserted on WoT. Please feel free to add what you got.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 03:24:38 PM by Figleaf »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2019, 03:18:15 PM »
My first two were issued by the Albatros superphosphate factory (link in Dutch) in Pernis. Superphosphate (SSP) is a chemical fertiliser. The town of Pernis is the site of a large petro-chemical complex, most of it Royal Dutch Shell.

I think the square token (1.3 grams 18mm Al) served as 5 cents, as it is reminiscent of the pre-war coin of that denomination. The round one (6.2 grams 26mm bronze) was likely to stand in for a guilder coin (28 mm pre-war, 25 mm post war). The coffee token may have been sold for 25 cent. Alternatively, or at the same time, the square token may have bought a sandwich, the round one a hot meal. The round token looks fit to be used in a machine and would have been important to late and overnight shifts, while the square one would be better used over the counter at lunch time.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 11:44:22 PM by Figleaf »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2019, 05:23:55 PM »
This is only sort of a Dutch token. The issuer is Dutch. Ballast Nedam is a big name in Dutch economic history. As the logo indicates, it works above and below water, constructing dams, polders, bridges, tunnels, aqueducts, canals, roads, offshore wind farms and the occasional airport. The tokens were ordered from the Utrecht mint in 1978.

However, almost unsurprisingly, the token was not for use in the Netherlands. They were made to be used in Saudi Arabia, presumably between 1981 and 1986, when the company constructed the King Fahd causeway. The Saudi coins apparently gave vending machines a bad case of hiccups. The series has denominations 10 (brass, 3.7 gram, 20 mm), 25 (brass, 22.5 mm), 50 (copper-nickel, 22.5 mm) and 100 (copper-nickel, 25 mm). They were probably denominated in halala, as the diameters are not too far off from those of the coins and the Dutch monetary system did not have a 50 cents. I will treat them as Saudi tokens.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 01:35:22 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2019, 06:38:51 PM »
From the grandiose to the mundane. Van Boekhoven - Bosch, had a large buiding on Wijde Begijnestraat (link in Dutch) and Begijnhof in Utrecht. Jacobus van Boekhoven started the company there in 1884. He succeeded in getting and keeping two major clients: Utrecht university and the forerunner of NS, the national railroad company. Van Boekhoven died in 1897, leaving the second largest printing house in Utrecht in the hands of his son in law. The company flourished, so when the neighbouring church of the beguines became available he had it demolished and built an extension of his premises. The design was made by Johannes Berghoef, a leading architect of the Delft school. The building is one of very few examples of an industrial building in that style. Another extension, in 1951, was done by the same architect, at the cost of the old orphanage. The building resembled an odd sort of Italian castle.

When European integration opened borders, printing fast became a losing proposition in the Netherlands, due to competition from low-wage countries, primarily Italy. Dutch printers fought back with mergers, to achieve a larger scale. Van Boekhoven merged with Bosch, another Utrecht printing house, in 1968. It moved out of the city in 1970, was bought by Dutch printer Roto Smeets in the 1990's and was finally closed in 2010. However, the old building was not demolished. It became the first example of an industrial monument that was converted to an apartment building with shops. I doubt the beguines would have understood.

Kooij says the token (brass, 6 gram, 22.5 mm) was used in a machine that exchanged them for coffee tokens. That seems pretty inefficient to me.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 11:47:13 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2019, 11:33:10 AM »
At independence, the "Raadspensionaris" was responsible for internal affairs, while the "Stadhouder" (the Prince of Orange) covered external affairs. In that sense, the Prince's staff was the forerunner of the ministry of foreign affairs and the ministry of war (now the ministry of defence.)

CaDi stands for Cantine Dienst (mess service). Judging by the size of the token (brass, 2.9 gram, 18 mm), it had a value of 10 cent. It may have been used to buy lunch sandwiches.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 01:38:05 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2019, 01:20:29 PM »
"Den Hoebert" on Westsingel in Venray started out as a school. It was closed by ROC Gilde opleidingen (link in Dutch), an education conglomerate. The building housed municipal services, but it was sold to project developer Jan Lucassen. As the city refused a license to turn it into a home for migrated labour, it is now vacant.

The token (aluminium, 1.9 gram, 25 mm) is most likely to date from the period the building was a school. It looks like a token for 1 gulden.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 01:38:51 PM by Figleaf »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2019, 01:59:38 PM »
See here for the coffee machine tokens and what little is known about the company.

This token (copper-nickel, 6.4 gram, 26 mm) is for vending machines.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2019, 03:20:40 PM »
A building in Utrecht and an organisation with the name Jaarbeurs (annual trade fair) that has year round activities is not a contradictio in terminis in the Netherlands; it is an icon of the country's society.

Business was bad in the first world war. Export and import (Netherlands Indies) markets were closed. The military took away employees. There was constant fear that the country would be invaded. In that climate, Utrecht alderman W.A. van Zijst and journalist Willem Graadt van Roggen organised in 1917 an event of a collection of wooden stalls to show the fruits of Dutch production. There was interest from the royal house, so that not only the target group of industrialists and merchants came, but also the wealthy and the influential.

The idea was a smashing and, from 1918, profitable success. In 1920, a permanent building on Vredenburg is constructed, which is almost permanently expanded. Jaarbeurs developed a tradition to present innovative articles, such as radio in 1919 and television in 1938. (photo: Prince Bernard of the Netherlands gets a car radio demo from Frits Philips). Activities ended in 1942. The Nazis used the complex as a Soldatenheim (rest and recreation for soldiers). The building was lightly damaged by allied bombing, but in 1946, it was open for business again.

As Marshal Aid kicked in, the reconstruction of the economy took flight and Jaarbeurs expanded explosively. More and more, the events were aimed at consumers. At last, there was no more room for expansion in the late sixties. A new building, adjacent to the Utrecht Central Railway station was opened in 1970.

The tide finally turned in 2008, as the Lehman crisis caused deep cuts in marketing budgets. Jaarbeurs at last realised they had to be internet savvy. Now, the idea is to organise events where a physical presence is a large advantage: a papal visit, a pop music event or the start of the Tour de France. Too late?

The token (copper-nickel, 6.2 gram, 26 mm) looks like it was worth 1 gulden.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2019, 11:18:53 PM »
Very interesting topic. Keep it going!  :)

In that last picture a sign of the times with a large ashtray almost as big as the loudspeaker.  :(
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2019, 05:17:28 PM »
The first law on the poor dates from 1854, which created civic organisations for the benefit of the poor. It needed further, more detailed rules, which were laid down in 1861. In 1921, the civic organisations were converted to municipal agencies, often called something like Gemeentelijke Instelling voor Maatschappelijk Hulpbetoon - Municipal institution for social assistance. After the second world war, the name Gemeentelijke Sociale Dienst became fashionable. In the case of Rotterdam, the last name change took place during the nazi occupation, so it is clear that the token was not used in vending machines, but rather as payment for a meal or part of a meal. Tokens are known with the numbers 1, 4 and 10. They might have served as payment for bread, milk and a hot meal respectively.

The earlier name versions dealt more in bread, fuel, clothing, shoes, bed linen and medical assistance. This was because earlier on, there was a conviction that all monetary support would be spent on alcoholic drinks. As there was more and more evidence that this presumption is false, the attitude towards help for the poor changed. The latest permutation, Municipal Social Service, gives monetary support only.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2019, 06:31:15 PM »
Merletcollege started as a dependency of Elzendaalcollege in the early seventies of the first millennium. It achieved independence by a merger with another local school and adopting the current name. It was originally on Grotestraat, with a dependency on Robijnstraat and in the nearby communities of Grave and Mill. The Cuijk school and its dependency moved to a new building on Katwijkseweg in 2017.

A nickel token, 11.5 gram, 31 mm, that could not be mistaken for an official coin due to its magnetism, weight and size. It looks like it was meant to stand in for a 2 gulden piece, so it must have been used in the Grotestraat location. The monogram is an M and its reflection, fashioned out of two Cs. The bird on the other side is of course a merlet. The text GOED VOOR EEN CONSUMPTIE means good for a consumption.

Merlet is derived from the French merlette (little blackbird) without beak or legs. The handicapped bird should be used only by noble families that participated in a crusade. There are seven merlets in the arms of the lords of Cuijk. The modern municipality of Cuijk uses the same arms.

Peter

Arms picture source: svg by User:Arch - HRvA SVG is own work., Public domain, File:Coat of arms of Cuijk.svg - Wikimedia Commons
« Last Edit: April 08, 2019, 06:51:08 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2019, 07:07:20 PM »
More on TCCEC here. The canteen tokens are harder to find than the coffee machine tokens. They look older also. I am showing the 10 cent (copper-nickel, 3.0 gram, 18mm). The 5 cent is the same size and shape, but bronze.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2019, 08:49:10 PM »
To a considerable extent, it was Bismarck's fault. He disliked the opposition, because it opposed him. ;) The opposition being catholic and Bismarck being protestant, Bismarck supported the Kulturkampf, the culture war, where the opposition was considered as nasty, un-german and *gasp* catholic.

Only such great thinking can explain why the sisters of divine providence, whose dangerous vocation it was to build schools and hospitals and orphanages, thought that it was a good idea to re-settle just across the German-Dutch border. The sisters continued their construction hobby there, and so, with the help of French sisters, miffed by being turned out of French education, the construction of the hospital of divine providence was started in 1908. Building must have been even slower than it is today, because the first world war intervened and the hospital could be opened only in 1927. The hospital was a success, but the name wasn't, so it was changed to Maasland ziekenhuis, after the river Meuse, Maas in Dutch.

The next tribulation was secularisation and better health. After a series of mergers, the hospital is now part of a health organisation. The hospital moved from the original building on Walramstraat in Sittard to a new one on Van der Hoffplein, where it is known as Orbis Medical Centre. Technically, that's in Geleen, but Sittard and Geleen had meanwhile been merged to one municipality, ingeniously called Sittard-Geleen.

There are tokens for 25 (brass, 20 mm, 3.4 gram) and 100 (copper-nickel, 20 mm) cent.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2019, 09:13:58 PM »
Nijmegen got its university in 1655, only to see it close in 1679, after the city had been taken by the French. On re-opening, in 1923, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen (Catholic University of Nijmegen) was a typical product of segmentation. In 1943, the nazis closed the university, as professors and students refused to sign the mandatory declaration of loyalty to the nazi state. The university buildings suffered considerable damage during a massive bombardment of the city by the US air force on 22nd February 1944. The university re-opened once more in 1945. The faculty for mathematics and natural sciences (Wis- en Natuurkunde) was established in 1957. It was housed in a separate building, due to destruction in 1944.

Nijmegen's Mensa Academica (University table) was at first located in the Roland Society building, that also housed students on upper floors. In 1945, the Nijmegen Mensa was moved to a separate location on Oranjesingel. As the number of students grew quickly, Mensa moved back to its first location on Oranjesingel 42 in 1956 (photo: Google maps.) By that time, the Roland Society had moved out of the building. The Nijmegen tokens were probably used on this location. At last, in 1969, a new, dedicated building was opened in Galgenveld (gallows field).

The token (copper-nickel, 6.3 gram, 26 mm) looks like it served as a gulden. The logo is trompe l'oeil. No idea what the C and dot stand for.

In case you were wondering, the picture and table on this page still refer to the Nijmegen tokens, because I hope someone will start a WoT section on these tokens, so they can be copied over easily ;)

That's all I have folks (at least for the moment >:D )

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Henk

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Re: Dutch canteen and corporate restaurants tokens
« Reply #14 on: Today at 05:24:10 PM »
I would like to add some information about the ASF/P tokens I found in the archive of the mint (Archief van 's Rijks Munt Utrecht). The tokens were ordered from the mint by "Albatros Superfosfaatfabrieken Pernis" on June 27, 1950. The order states that on one side these should be stamped with A.S.F. with P. below the S. 15000 pieces of Aluminium, the size of the zinc 5 cents coin (18 x 18 mm) and 15000 pieces in bronze the size of the zinc 25 cents coin (26 mm) were ordered. The intended use of the tokens is not mentioned. The price was  f 325 and f 465  respectively. The tokens were sent from the Mint on August 31, 1950. There may have been later deliveries of the same tokens but I have not checked this.

Obviously ASF/P is an abbreviation for Albatros Superfosfaatfabrieken Pernis.

The zinc 5 and 25 cents coins, together with the pre-war coins of this denomination, were taken out of circulation on 15 August 1950.