Guernsey 10 shillings 1966

Started by <k>, April 01, 2019, 01:40:16 AM

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<k>

In 1966, in the UK and the Channel Islands, the half crown was the highest circulating denomination of coin. The crown (5 shillings) was just a collector coin by that time. Ten shillings was a bank note. It was a lot of money and worth close on 20 pounds in today's terms.

That same year, Guernsey issued a collector 10 shillings coin to commemorate King William and 1066. That is a date that every British person knows, of course. The idea of 10 shillings as a coin was quite novel - even though the UK would release a 50 pence coin only three years later. And equally striking, the coin was square too - more or less. Arnold Machin's elegant new portrait of the Queen graced the obverse. It was still something of a novelty. The Machin effigy would not be seen in the UK until 1968, when the first decimal coins - 5 pence and 10 pence - were issued.

The equally elegant portrait of King William on the reverse of the coin was also the work of Arnold Machin. Many a collector must have wanted that coin as soon as they saw it. How radical was it in those days, before commemorative collector coins were released in such huge numbers and with so many gimmicky variations?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

And the reverse.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.