Author Topic: 8 reales  (Read 315 times)

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Offline Desibot

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8 reales
« on: March 24, 2019, 12:17:20 PM »
Hi guys

I have been offered these two coins
But dont know much regarding them or the strange
counterstamps

Any help would be much appreciate


Offline Manzikert

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Re: 8 reales
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2019, 05:28:47 PM »
The marks are what are known as 'chop-marks'. This indicates that these were used in China: each merchant through whose hands they passed put a small mark on them, supposedly so that he could recognise them if they passed through his hands again. He could then be sure that he had checked them and they weren't fakes.

Some of these coins can have many dozens of these marks, and I remember seeing one many years ago that had been 'chopped' so many times on the same side that it was slightly cup shaped. The marks can vary in size but yours are all relatively small.

Mexican 8 reales like these ar very commonly marked, as are the later republican ones. Less common (and more sought after) are Japanese yen and American trade dollars.

Alan

Offline brandm24

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Re: 8 reales
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2019, 05:42:22 PM »
The 8-Reales were a standard for international commerce and trade, and as such were widely accepted by Chinese merchants in trade. The chops were applied mostly by money changers and bankers to affirm their authenticity. Other large silver and gold coins were readily accepted as well, but as Alan said, the Japanese coins and Trade Dollars were near the top of the food chain.

There's a reference to these published in 2014 and written by Colin Gullberg. There's also a collector's club devoted to chopmarked coins, but I can't recall their name. Thanks for showing us your coins, Desibot.

Bruce
Bruce