Author Topic: Buying BU Sets  (Read 3505 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Buying BU Sets
« on: October 12, 2009, 06:14:31 PM »
A couple of days ago,I came across a collector who is selling Slovenia BU set(2007) for INR 900 (just above 18 US$).I know that this is a very good price for the set,and I'm certainly thinking to buy it.Since I'm collecting Euro coins by type,I will be collecting the new map coins too.So I thought why shouldn't I collect the new map coins in BU sets?But since they are issued for a price far above the face (and I'll have to buy them either from E-bay or some private dealers),it might not be a good idea to go ahead with buying BU sets.One thing I like about the BU sets is that they look quite attractive (packaging and all),but it hardly has any importance.

I'll be happy if anyone can guide me..should I buy BU sets or should collect the normal UNC (loose) coins...

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2009, 06:53:02 PM »
My views?

If it is within my remit (one of each UK decimal issued in base metal) and I need it to complete the collection, then yes.

My choice is a) best possible from circulation, b) BU single coin, then c) Proof single coin.   Next comes d) BU set and lastly e) Proof set and f) other coins outside but related to my remit.

I will not go for coins which are in other than base metal as I consider them to be jewellery/bullion rather than proper coins.   This does not affect legitimate coins issued only in rare metal (such as silver Maundy coins) and at some stage I might even try to get a gold Sovereign, but only as an example of what is still valid.

Obviously the choice is up to you, but you need to clearly define your own remit first.

Helpful?   Probably not, but I hope that it is.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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Offline Bimat

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Buying BU Sets
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2009, 07:06:13 PM »
Thanks,Bill.But there are some other factors which I should take into consideration.

1.Buying single(commemorative) BU coin : In Europe,they are sold in 'coin cards',issue price generally ranging between 10-15 Euro.Not all countries do that(I think,but not very sure).Note that it consists only of the commemorative issue and not the regular issues.Since I'm not a date collector,it's not a problem at least for me,but these coin cards are far overpriced,I think.

2.Buying Proof Set:Sorry,out of my budget. :(

3.Complete BU Set: Again,there are two possibilities.a) Those sets which come with the commemorative issue of the issuing country for that year.(Total of 9 coins).(Again,I don't know how many countries issue these kind of sets,but Germany certainly does.)b) Those sets which do not include commemorative issue (total of 8 coins).

For me,even the Euro cent pieces aren't so important,I collect only the 1 and 2 Euro pieces..So,buying a BU set may not be that important for me..

Aditya

It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2009, 07:28:41 PM »
Hard to play the voice of authority here. :) In general I am not a fan of such coin sets, coin cards and packs - in fact, if I buy them, I usually take the coins out and put them in my own holders or sleeves. Proof coins (if I buy one, which is not very often) excepted; those I would not "grab".

Of course it sometimes is difficult to get the "raw" coins that we want, and Slovenia 2007 may be such a case. 900 rupees is about 13 euro, and that is less than the issue price as far as I remember. Sounds OK to me. When you get the set, you can still decide whether you want to keep it as it is, or open it and keep only the bimetallic pieces ...

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2009, 07:38:49 PM »
It's easy for me. There's a dealer on the weekly Amsterdam coin market who has unc euro coins from rolls and his prices are not too bad. I try to get as many as possible from trader friends and from circulation, but I don't expect to get certain far-flung euro area coins, so I buy them from him.

I just got a coin set today. It looks fine, bu even ;D, but I wouldn't buy them myself. The only way I can keep track of what I have is looking in the appropriate album. Coin sets don't fit in. I made a spreadsheet with what I had to stock separately, but packaged coins are still a bother.

I could nevertheless imagine that in a hot, moist climate, coin sets have at least the advantage of keeping your coins dry and safe.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2009, 07:48:12 PM »
Aditya, I fully understand your dilemma.

You seem to collect certain values of coin from throughout the Euro area, whereas I collect only from within the UK, but everything (base matal) within that heading, and only one of each unless I have to duplicate by getting sets.   'Respectable circulated' is good enough for me.   Your range is huge compared with mine and I do not envy you having to make the decision.

On a very much smaller scale, this year is the 40th anniversary of our 50p coin.   A full set of all sixteen varieties, all dated 2009, is available as a Proof base metal set.   At 195 (today 209.77).   It is within my remit to collect, but ...

When I joined the railway in 1960, I was taught something that has served me well throughout my life.   Ask yourself four questions.   Do I want it?   Do I need it?   Can I afford it?   Can I do without it?

I will probably end up getting the set, otherwise I might lose the chance to obtain it (and I have a 10% discount with the Royal Mint until the end of this month).

Still, that doesn't solve your problem, unless you decide to re-write your remit.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2009, 08:54:29 PM »
Another addition to my previous message.

Our Royal Mint has a nasty habit of not including all commemorative issues in a year set.   This might be understandable if there were a sudden death in, say, the Royal family, but most issues are decided well beforehand.

It would be nice, even at/after the end of a year, to be able to purchase a full set for the year, but it doesn't seem to work that way.

How wonderful it would be if we were able to purchase a full set of 'circulation standard' coins for a year at the beginning of the next year and also be certain that every variety is included (i.e. that no Proof or BU only coins were issued) at face value plus suitable packaging and postage.

Bill.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2009, 09:08:37 PM by bilnic »
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline Bimat

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Buying BU Sets
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2009, 06:01:21 AM »
Buying one or two BU sets is not a problem for me,but buying BU sets from all the 16 countries would be pretty expensive,mainly because of two things-I can not buy directly from the respective banks since they charge about 20Euro for shipping to India,and I'll have to buy them from private dealers which will sell them for a price above issue price.(+shipping).And even if I buy all the sets,I will not able to concentrate on rest of my collecting area..

As far as Slovenia BU set is concerned,I'll ask the collector again if he's still having the set,and will buy happily if is's still available.I didn't buy at that moment because I was not very sure..Strictly speaking,I don't want to get addicted to these kind of expensive sets,but still...

Anyways,thanks for all the comments! :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Tom0000

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2009, 03:50:23 PM »
The buying the BU coins is good if :
- you will keep the cons in the folder all the time
- you are looking for coins in a bit better quality than coins from rolls

It is bad if:
- you will move coin from folder to capsule (from this moment it is not BU coin but UNC) because your all collection is in capsules
- the quality of folder material will degrade after some years and if you will not move the coin to capsule you will have the coin destroyed
(the Vatican folder for 2E doing it, the same German folder for 2E Proof from 2006 is doing the same ...)

I am buying only UNC sets and BU set version only if the UNC does not exist (like Belgium 2008).
« Last Edit: October 29, 2009, 04:24:11 PM by Tom0000 »

Offline Andrius

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2015, 06:26:08 PM »
I will recomend to collect Proof sets. They looks much nicer, and in fact, in future, they will rise in price more, then usual BU coins or coins from circulation.
For example, Lithuania issued quite limited set of proof 7000 pcs, but BU sets were minted 35 000. So try too look for rare proof sets, in other case, good quality circulated coins will be good enouth for Your collection.

Offline Bimat

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Buying BU Sets
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2015, 10:45:40 AM »
I will recomend to collect Proof sets. They looks much nicer, and in fact, in future, they will rise in price more, then usual BU coins or coins from circulation.
For example, Lithuania issued quite limited set of proof 7000 pcs, but BU sets were minted 35 000. So try too look for rare proof sets, in other case, good quality circulated coins will be good enouth for Your collection.

I live in a country where demand for euro BU/Proof sets is close to zero. ;) I actually mean it; very few Indian collectors collect euro coins, those who collect collect unc coins, not BU or Proof as importing them can be troublesome at times. ::) So no matter how much a particular BU/Proof set increases in value, it hardly matters.

I do have few BU/Proof sets got over a period of time (the first post in this topic is about 6 years old :o) and it's indeed a pleasure when I look at the shiny coins. :D Investment wise, ohh well.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Buying BU Sets
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2015, 11:26:22 AM »
You came far in 6 years, Aditya!

Long ago, I sent you a collection of euro coins from circulation. You realised very quickly, from going to coin shows, that Indian collectors largely prefer to collect Indian coins. You decided to go your own way; not the way of the mass of Indian collectors, not my way. You developed a taste for beauty and the interest of other countries and cultures, ranging from the euro to Japan. It all came together in a collection full of character, reflecting your own interests and priorities.

I enjoyed watching your ride. Here are the lessons:
  • Young collectors can have great potential for the hobby. If not them, who?
  • Don't tell others what (not) to collect. Circumstances, interests and characters vary widely.
  • Never worry about the selling price.
Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Buying BU Sets
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2015, 11:44:40 AM »
It's all because of good advisers like Peter, Christian, a3v1 (I miss him very much! :'()!

Although I'm not avid collector of BU/Proof sets, what I have learned that getting them is indeed not that difficult, if you keep Monaco and Vatican out. Almost all the EU Central Banks are VERY customer friendly and ordering directly from them is pretty easy. Let me tell you my recent personal experience: I wanted to get the latest Lithuanian BU and Proof Set from Bank of Lithuania. They were ready to ship them to India but they wouldn't accept payment by credit card. I just dropped a message to one of the forum member from Germany (needless to mention his name ;)) if he could do payment on my behalf. He was quick to do so (after getting order details from me like reference number etc), I got confirmation from the Central Bank regarding payment, also got the sets couple of weeks later. 8)

What I have learned in my 6 years of experience as a member of this forum is that it's the networking that matters in coin collecting; whether you are buying or swapping coins. I have also established good relationships with some of the German dealers for the coins which need to be bought from dealers only. They are happy to help non EU collectors with some concession / actual postage. :) (I know couple of dealers who actually deducted VAT charges from my invoice as I wasn't supposed to pay it!)

Like a3v1 used to tell me all the time when I was a student with little money for coins: Patience is the key for collecting euro coins! This is absolutely correct!

Aditya



It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.