Author Topic: New mixed hoard found  (Read 101 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: New mixed hoard found
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2019, 08:46:47 AM »
Saving the picture before it disappears. It shows how the coins were originally stringed. I trust the journalist happily mixed up Chinese coins and Japanese imitations.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: New mixed hoard found
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2019, 10:20:33 AM »
A collectors worst nightmare as their very rare 'unique' cash piece suddenly becomes very common as the remaining 200,000 are discovered in a jar :(
Vic

Offline Figleaf

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Re: New mixed hoard found
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2019, 11:50:51 AM »
Indeed, but only if the find comes on the market.

Anyway, this is also the dream of the pro-numismatist. A very large hoard, especially of similar coins is perfect for statistical analysis. At this time in history, the holy grails in numismatic research seem to be a) generating information on how many coins could be struck with one die and b) charting the trace metals in coins.

a) is important in that the number of dies can be guessed by the number of varieties found. Together, this leads to rough estimates of the money supply (keep in mind that in most areas in most eras, all money was coin, except for metal bars, that could yet hinder calculations). That would be a significant contribution to economic history, a branch of the science I would consider under-developed. BM's Peter Spufford has done very important work in the area with admirable original research.

b) is important in that it could (at least in theory) link coins to mines. This would throw light on the motivation for and results of conquests. It might also help linking anonymous coins to issuers. Though I fear that re-melting would be a serious factor that disturbs the results measured, especially during and shortly after war, there may be some excellent new information out there.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.