Unadopted Madagascar designs of 1973 by Michael Rizzello

Started by <k>, March 12, 2019, 11:42:51 AM

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<k>



Michael Rizzello's sketch of the proposed common obverse, showing the national seal.




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<k>



The animals shown are all easy to imagine, with the exception perhaps of the helmet bird.

The bird is also known as the helmet vanga (Euryceros prevostii). It is quite colourful
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<k>

There are some superb designs here that would have made an excellent set. Some designs would have had to be omitted, of course. The design of the traditional carving (100 francs) would not have fitted well into the set.

It is a pity that such a set was ultimately not adopted. The Madagascan government was moving towards a communistic regime, and in the later 1970s it adopted rather communistic designs of agricultural workers - very different from the wildlife designs shown here. Unfortunately, these communistic designs for the higher denominations were added to the old-fashioned designs of the 1960s, showing plants and a zebu's head. Stylistically, the two halves of the issued set did not go well together. A set such as was proposed here would have had a unity of style that the issued and current set lacks.




To see the Madagascan coin designs to date, click on the link below:

Coinage of Madagascar.
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<k>



Mr Rizzello's zebu design reminds me of his cow or bull design for the Gambia.
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<k>

Now that many African countries have updated their coinages and moved more towards wildlife themes, perhaps Madagascar might do so also. Some of the themes shown here would make an attractive set.
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Figleaf

Congratulations on outstanding research and thanks for posting the images here.

I agree with your description of the Ratsiraka regime as "communistic", but would like to add that during the cold war, African leaders quite often assumed labels like "Socialist", "Communist" or "Islamic" that did not so much cover a political direction as a cover to disenfranchise the opposition and enrich themselves, their family, clan and tribe in that order. In that situation, symbols - being free and having no consequences - were important. While it is true that the coins of this period are not as nice as the ones you present, the designs actually used give insight into the reality of the situation on the island.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

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<k>



Michael Rizzello's sketch of the proposed common obverse, showing Madagascar's national seal.

Image copyright of The Royal Mint Museum.



The images at the start of this topic were scans of scans.

The Royal Mint Museum has kindly now sent me images of Michael Rizzello's original sketches.
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<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Alternative 5 francs.  Malagasy grasshopper.




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<k>

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<k>



Alternative 10 francs.  Water yam. Also known as the lace leaf plant.




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<k>



20 francs.  Lemur - the aye-aye: Daubentonia madagascariensis.




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