Author Topic: Falkland Islands: royal rejection  (Read 487 times)

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Offline <k>

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Falkland Islands: royal rejection
« on: March 03, 2019, 05:37:49 PM »
In 1986 the Falkland Islands wished to issue a collector coin to commemorate the wedding Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson. The Royal Mint commissioned English artist and sculptor Michael Rizzello to provide the design.

Below you see Mr Rizzello's sketch of the design.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Falkland Islands: royal rejection
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2019, 05:38:48 PM »
Below you see Mr Rizzello's plaster model of his design.

Is this just a poor photo, or did something go horribly wrong. Usually Mr Rizzello had produced superb work, and he had decades of experience by then.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Falkland Islands: royal rejection
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2019, 05:41:39 PM »
Deputy Mint Master Dr Jeremy Gerhard considered the model to be of such poor quality that he advised the Falkland Islands to reject the design.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Falkland Islands: royal rejection
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2019, 05:43:37 PM »


Falkland Islands, 25 pounds, 1986.  Royal Wedding of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson.



Robert Elderton was chosen to provide the issued design, seen above.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Falkland Islands: royal rejection
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2019, 12:38:24 AM »
Don't know about the plaster, but I think I know what went wrong with the photo. The original was in colour. Someone decided to make it a b/w picture. It was either not yet possible to turn it into greyscale at this time, or whoever transformed it made the wrong choice. Alternatively, it was transferred by fax through a machine that was badly manipulated. Pure b/w is meant for well printed text, in order e.g. to facilitate OCR. It does weird things to pictures.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.