Author Topic: Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)  (Read 137 times)

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Offline Overlord

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Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)
« on: February 20, 2019, 04:22:53 PM »
Obverse: Allahu Akbar
Reverse: Jalla Jalalahu, Ilahi 34

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2019, 11:00:07 AM »
Mmm. The characters black, the flower petals red, the stems and leaves green, the fruit orange, all on a silvery background. :)

I wonder why they made the coins rectangular. I also wonder why they reverted to round eventually. Surely, it wasn't for the vending machines.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2019, 11:09:11 AM »
Square flans would be easier to make, if you had a beaten flat sheet of silver then straight cuts with a chisel would make the flan. Round flans would require a lot more work to get it reasonably shaped.
Vic

Offline asm

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Re: Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2019, 01:45:46 PM »
Vic, were the round ones not cut from bars? If that was so, would these not have been cut from square bars? Much more difficult to make as compared to the round ones.

Amit
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Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2019, 04:40:53 PM »
Vic, were the round ones not cut from bars? If that was so, would these not have been cut from square bars? Much more difficult to make as compared to the round ones.

Amit

It  is the cutting method that concerns me, as someone who dabbles in metalwork myself I think cutting flans from big round sausage shaped bars would be a major task back then, you just could not chop a thick silver bar into slices so they would have to use a saw of some kind, no high speed steel blades either so even the blades would have to be made by hand.  Rupees usually show a reasonably smooth flan behind the inscription, cutting a bar in any metal with a hacksaw leaves a very scarred surface so how would they remove that.

 I always thought they were cut from sheet silver and beaten into shape, perhaps this explains why Rupees often have a many faceted edge, evidence of numerous hammer knocks

In W.W. Webb's 'currencies of Rajputana'  he visits numerous mints and describes watching them 'making silver sheets & cutting into proper weight' forming & stamping the coins etc. Although a later era than the Mughals should we presume the same practices continued into later centuries?
Vic

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar, AR Rupee, anonymous type, Ilahi year 34, KM#91.1 (11.2 g)
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2019, 10:20:46 PM »
What if the square coins were cut from hammered plates and the round ones from a roll?

In the Netherland Indies, they use Japanese rolls of copper to make round coins. Squares were used only for emergency coins (bonks). These people were real penny pinchers, so maybe there's a secret there to make slices from rolls easily.

Inca walls come to mind. They are made of perfectly fitting huge stone blocks with irregular shapes. No cement or anything else we still need to fill up the gaps. I haven't heard an explanation yet of how the incas could make them fit so well. there must be lost production methods out there.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.