Author Topic: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)  (Read 605 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2019, 08:10:35 PM »
Here you see the typical obverse of the heptagonal coins of the set, as seen on the 500 dobras coin.

See also: An Alphabet of Heptagons: Seven-Sided Coins.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2019, 08:12:10 PM »
The reverse of the 500 dobras coin features a mona monkey on a sugar cane stalk, with the Pico de São Tomé mountain in the background.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2019, 08:17:33 PM »
The 1000 dobras coin features an Etlingera elatior, also known as torch ginger, red ginger lily, torch lily, Philippine wax flower, and porcelain rose.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2019, 08:21:01 PM »
The 2000 dobras coin, the highest denomination of the set, features mixed fruit.

I see bananas, but which other fruit can you identify?

Online Figleaf

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2019, 09:12:10 PM »
I have a book in my personal library entitled "Coins and identity". That title encapsulates in three words what these coins fail to do: support a São Tomé e Príncipe national identity. I am badly placed to make that criticism, because I know far too little of São Tomé e Príncipe to be able to make a proposal. I noted de Pico de São Tomé, but it's a background item where it appears. I saw the coat of arms, but they are basically a colonial device, as all heraldry in Africa.

Maybe "national identity" sounds trivial to you. It isn't. A common destiny is what keeps the peace, a feeling of not belonging or worse is a precursor to civil war. If you start fighting corruption and one group is perceived to be victimised or exempt, the fight is lost. If there is a crisis and feelings explode, rifts in the civil fabric can turn unrest into a fight of one tribe against another.

In the effort to establish a national identity, coins are important. If all they have to offer is exhortations to produce more food and cute agricultural export products, they are failures.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2019, 09:29:00 PM »
This is a small country with a tiny population. Probably it is easier for the population to feel united than disunited. I am however always surprised when former colonies choose to keep colonial paraphanalia. Fiji, for instance, has so far decided to keep its colonial flag and coat of arms, because too many Fijians are attached to them. There is no accounting for taste, but the views of the people, however conservative, usually have to be taken into consideration.

Furthermore, the population of São Tomé e Príncipe mostly speaks Portuguese or a creole version of it. We are told that the culture is a fusion of African and European influences. So perhaps the islanders are comfortable with that.

FAO-themed designs were popular with many non-Western countries in the 1970s. They are or were largely agricultural economies, and there is nothing wrong with that. If you include political statements on a coin, or these days even a reference to "God", then some people will object. Perhaps São Tomé e Príncipe has deliberately chosen non-controversial designs for its coins. Kenya has just recently replaced portraits of its presidents with designs featuring wildlife. That too is their choice.

I am English, and looking at the coins of the UK, with their Latin legends, you might think the Romans had never left Britain. So, on that basis, what right would I have to criticise the coin designs of São Tomé e Príncipe?  ;)

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2019, 10:05:39 AM »
I saw the coat of arms, but they are basically a colonial device, as all heraldry in Africa.

I would say that a coat of arms is no longer colonial. These symbols developed from medieval European heraldry and were certainly originally used by European countries. They were then imposed on Europe's colonial possessions. However, even after the death of empires, coats of arms went international. Other countries made them their own. São Tomé e Príncipe did not keep the colonial coat of arms but developed a radically new version.

In a similar way, the West, starting with the USA, took black music and made it their own by transforming it into pop and rock music. Black people developed jazz, not in Africa, but in the USA. Not all adoptions, whether coats of arms or music, should be considered as elements of pseudo-colonialism.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2019, 11:42:22 AM »
From Wikipedia:

On August 25, 2017, the Central Bank of São Tomé e Príncipe announced a redenomination of the dobra, in commemoration of the Central Bank's 25th anniversary, with 1 new dobra equal to 1,000 of the previous dobras. Five coins, in denominations of 10-, 20- and 50 cêntimos and 1 and 2 new dobras, were issued on 1 January 2018.

As always, the common obverse was the national coat of arms, as seen below.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2019, 11:43:37 AM »


The reverse of the coins featured an attractive set of bird designs. The designs were the work of Royal Mint artist Jody Clark.



   10 céntimos.      Príncipe kingfisher.   
   20 céntimos.      São Tomé green pigeon.   
   50 céntimos.      Grey parrot.   
   1 dobra.      Green Sunbird.   
   2 dobras.      Falcon.   

 
« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 01:32:58 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2019, 11:44:37 AM »
A closer look at the lower denominations.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2019, 11:45:01 AM »
A closer look at the higher denominations.

Offline WillieBoyd2

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2019, 05:57:51 AM »
Another coin with a turkey on it, the 1977 10 dobras coin.

:)
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Offline Big_M

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #27 on: January 08, 2019, 11:59:54 AM »
The reverse of the 10 dobras coin featured chickens, a goose, a turkey, and eggs.

The obverse (not shown) featured the coat of arms.

Based on the size of the bird, I would rather say it is a duck rather than a goose.

Offline <k>

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Re: Modern coinage of São Tomé e Príncipe (Saint Thomas and Prince)
« Reply #28 on: January 08, 2019, 01:30:55 PM »
Based on the size of the bird, I would rather say it is a duck rather than a goose.

"Duck is the common name for a large number of species in the waterfowl family Anatidae which also includes swans and geese."

It could be either. I have seen geese with long necks and geese with shorter necks, so that the shorter-necked breeds look like geese.




Offline <k>

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