Author Topic: Kenya's coinage since independence  (Read 1188 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Kenya's coinage since independence
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2019, 06:47:31 PM »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Kenya's coinage since independence
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2019, 06:53:14 PM »
It is interesting to compare the 2005 and 2010 versions of the old 10 shillings coins.





Larger arms, 2005.





Smaller arms, 2010.

 
« Last Edit: March 16, 2019, 11:33:58 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

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Offline <k>

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Re: Kenya's coinage since independence
« Reply #32 on: January 03, 2019, 07:03:08 PM »
Some Tanzanian coins showing the denominations in Swahili.








Kenya's coins now incorporate Swahili legends too.







See also: Denominations shown in different scripts.

 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 05:59:12 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

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Offline <k>

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Re: Kenya's coinage since independence
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2019, 11:03:10 PM »
Members africancoins and Big_M both kindly sent me the PDF of the Royal Mint's annual report of 2005. I am now able to show the page that illustrates the 5 and 10 cent coins of 2005.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Kenya's coinage since independence
« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2019, 11:23:26 AM »
OBVERSE AND REVERSE FONTS



Here the fonts are similar, though the letters are necessarily narrower on the reverse, showing Kenyatta, because there are more words.





On the 2005 version of the 50 cents, the obverse font is now distinctly sans serif, while the reverse font is serif.





On the Arap Moi coins, the font is of the same type on both sides.





These same differences apply to the bimetallic coins.





Most standard circulation coins, I believe, have similar fonts on the obverse and reverse.

How many do you know of that do not?

 
« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 09:05:47 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.