Author Topic: Netherlands non-machine coffee token  (Read 350 times)

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Offline Henk

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Netherlands non-machine coffee token
« on: November 22, 2018, 05:03:02 PM »
I have the following coffee token from the Netherlands which is not for use in a coffee machine;
Zinc, 30 mm. Holed at top
O: A. VUIJK & Zn. / KOFFIE
R: A

The name Vuijk is relatively common, there are several firms with this name. The most likely issuer seems to be a shipbuilder with this name, operating in Capelle aan den Ijssel from 1872 to 1979. See: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._Vuijk_%26_Zonen

The token probably dates from the 1950's of 60's

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Netherlands non-machine coffee token
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2018, 06:01:35 PM »
Unless Mr. Vuijk dealt in coffee, it is likely a token that's good for coffee. The hole is presumably for easy collection and handling. The token pre-dates coffee machines. The metal and diameter are wrong, but common pre-1940. My best guess is that it was used like the Koolhoven token, whose use is described in the second paragraph here.

As for the issuer, the shipyard looks like a pretty good guess to me. There are several coffee machine tokens for shipyards in this area. A member of a historical society for one of them told me how a coffee token cost 5 cents. That's a pre-1940 price, therefore an indication that coffee tokens were in use on the yards before coffee machines came about. A shipyard is a large and cold place. It makes sense to have someone go around with coffee regularly, rather than have the workers drift to the canteen and back to work again.

I may be over-speculating, but it seems that the single A on the other side is the result of the dot after the A landing on the wrong place. The engraver shrugged and started again on the other side. That sort of procedure sounds like the tokens were made in-house. A shipyard would have the metal (zinc was used a.o. for piping on board), machines and know-how to do that.

May I encourage you to add this token to WoT? Let me know if you need help.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Henk

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Re: Netherlands non-machine coffee token
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2018, 08:43:25 PM »
I may be over-speculating, but it seems that the single A on the other side is the result of the dot after the A landing on the wrong place. The engraver shrugged and started again on the other side. That sort of procedure sounds like the tokens were made in-house.

I doubt the token was made by individually punching the letters, the inscription is far to regular for that. I assume it was die struck.

The years it was used is a guess having no documentary evidence. It may indeed have been before 1940

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Netherlands non-machine coffee token
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2018, 08:55:49 PM »
I am 100% sure it was engraved. The drill marks are visible inside the letters.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Henk

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Re: Netherlands non-machine coffee token
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2019, 04:36:18 PM »
Another non-machine coffee token. This one is made of white plastic, diameter 25 mm and printed on both sides in white/red.
O: o ALBERT'S CORNER BIJ AMERSFOORT O / VLOOSWIJKSEWEG 1 OUD-LEUSDEN / (cup with ac above in circle)
R: (two cups in circle) goed voor een / eerste en tweede / kopje koffie

The token is good for a first and a second cup of coffee.

Albert's Corner is a chain of restaurants started by the Albert Heijn Company in the Netherlands in 1961. Later the name was changed into simply ac restaurants. There also were restaurants in Belgium. They were taken over by Jumbo from jan 1, 2017 and are now called "La Place".

There was such a restaurant near the University building where I had my lectures in the 1970's. A feature was that you got a second cup of coffee for free. I often spend time there between or after lectures.